Dietary iron and heme iron intake and risk of breast cancer

A prospective cohort study

Geoffrey C. Kabat, Anthony B. Miller, Meera Jain, Thomas E. Rohan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies suggest that elevated body iron levels may contribute to breast carcinogenesis; however, epidemiologic evidence is lacking. We used data from a large cohort study of Canadian women to assess breast cancer in association with total iron and heme iron intake. Among 49,654 women ages 40 to 59 followed for an average of 16.4 years, we identified 2,545 incident breast cancer cases. Data from a food frequency questionnaire administered at baseline were used to calculate total dietary iron and heme iron intake. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we found no association of iron or heme iron intake with risk of breast cancer overall, in women consuming30+ gof alcohol per day, or in women who had ever used hormone replacement therapy. The present study offers no support for an association of iron or heme iron intake with breast cancer risk or for a modification by iron of the effect of alcohol or estrogen. However, further cohort studies with repeated measurement of iron intake are warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1306-1308
Number of pages3
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2007

Fingerprint

Dietary Iron
Heme
Cohort Studies
Iron
Prospective Studies
Breast Neoplasms
Alcohols
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Proportional Hazards Models
Estrogens
Carcinogenesis
Breast

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Dietary iron and heme iron intake and risk of breast cancer : A prospective cohort study. / Kabat, Geoffrey C.; Miller, Anthony B.; Jain, Meera; Rohan, Thomas E.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 16, No. 6, 01.06.2007, p. 1306-1308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{cca343c01801432483249bbb575c2ef0,
title = "Dietary iron and heme iron intake and risk of breast cancer: A prospective cohort study",
abstract = "Recent studies suggest that elevated body iron levels may contribute to breast carcinogenesis; however, epidemiologic evidence is lacking. We used data from a large cohort study of Canadian women to assess breast cancer in association with total iron and heme iron intake. Among 49,654 women ages 40 to 59 followed for an average of 16.4 years, we identified 2,545 incident breast cancer cases. Data from a food frequency questionnaire administered at baseline were used to calculate total dietary iron and heme iron intake. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we found no association of iron or heme iron intake with risk of breast cancer overall, in women consuming30+ gof alcohol per day, or in women who had ever used hormone replacement therapy. The present study offers no support for an association of iron or heme iron intake with breast cancer risk or for a modification by iron of the effect of alcohol or estrogen. However, further cohort studies with repeated measurement of iron intake are warranted.",
author = "Kabat, {Geoffrey C.} and Miller, {Anthony B.} and Meera Jain and Rohan, {Thomas E.}",
year = "2007",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-07-0086",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "1306--1308",
journal = "Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention",
issn = "1055-9965",
publisher = "American Association for Cancer Research Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dietary iron and heme iron intake and risk of breast cancer

T2 - A prospective cohort study

AU - Kabat, Geoffrey C.

AU - Miller, Anthony B.

AU - Jain, Meera

AU - Rohan, Thomas E.

PY - 2007/6/1

Y1 - 2007/6/1

N2 - Recent studies suggest that elevated body iron levels may contribute to breast carcinogenesis; however, epidemiologic evidence is lacking. We used data from a large cohort study of Canadian women to assess breast cancer in association with total iron and heme iron intake. Among 49,654 women ages 40 to 59 followed for an average of 16.4 years, we identified 2,545 incident breast cancer cases. Data from a food frequency questionnaire administered at baseline were used to calculate total dietary iron and heme iron intake. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we found no association of iron or heme iron intake with risk of breast cancer overall, in women consuming30+ gof alcohol per day, or in women who had ever used hormone replacement therapy. The present study offers no support for an association of iron or heme iron intake with breast cancer risk or for a modification by iron of the effect of alcohol or estrogen. However, further cohort studies with repeated measurement of iron intake are warranted.

AB - Recent studies suggest that elevated body iron levels may contribute to breast carcinogenesis; however, epidemiologic evidence is lacking. We used data from a large cohort study of Canadian women to assess breast cancer in association with total iron and heme iron intake. Among 49,654 women ages 40 to 59 followed for an average of 16.4 years, we identified 2,545 incident breast cancer cases. Data from a food frequency questionnaire administered at baseline were used to calculate total dietary iron and heme iron intake. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we found no association of iron or heme iron intake with risk of breast cancer overall, in women consuming30+ gof alcohol per day, or in women who had ever used hormone replacement therapy. The present study offers no support for an association of iron or heme iron intake with breast cancer risk or for a modification by iron of the effect of alcohol or estrogen. However, further cohort studies with repeated measurement of iron intake are warranted.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34250844504&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34250844504&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-07-0086

DO - 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-07-0086

M3 - Article

VL - 16

SP - 1306

EP - 1308

JO - Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention

JF - Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention

SN - 1055-9965

IS - 6

ER -