Diagnosis and treatment of atrophic vaginitis

Gloria A. Bachmann, Nicole S. Nevadunsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

203 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Up to 40 percent of postmenopausal women have symptoms of atrophic vaginitis. Because the condition is attributable to estrogen deficiency, it may occur in premenopausal women who take antiestrogenic medications or who have medical or surgical conditions that result in decreased levels of estrogen. The thinned endometrium and increased vaginal pH level induced by estrogen deficiency predispose the vagina and urinary tract to infection and mechanical weakness. The earliest symptoms are decreased vaginal lubrication, followed by other vaginal and urinary symptoms that may be exacerbated by superimposed infection. Once other causes of symptoms have been eliminated, treatment usually depends on estrogen replacement. Estrogen replacement therapy may be provided systemically or locally, but the dosage and delivery method must be individualized. Vaginal moisturizers and lubricants, and participation in coitus may also be beneficial in the treatment of women with atrophic vaginitis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3090-3096
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Family Physician
Volume61
Issue number10
StatePublished - May 15 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Atrophic Vaginitis
Estrogens
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Lubrication
Lubricants
Coitus
Vagina
Endometrium
Urinary Tract Infections
Therapeutics
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Diagnosis and treatment of atrophic vaginitis. / Bachmann, Gloria A.; Nevadunsky, Nicole S.

In: American Family Physician, Vol. 61, No. 10, 15.05.2000, p. 3090-3096.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bachmann, Gloria A. ; Nevadunsky, Nicole S. / Diagnosis and treatment of atrophic vaginitis. In: American Family Physician. 2000 ; Vol. 61, No. 10. pp. 3090-3096.
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