Developmental analysis of CNS pathology in the lysosomal storage disease α-mannosidosis

Allison C. Crawley, Steven U. Walkley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The lysosomal storage disease α-mannosidosis is due to absence or defective function of lysosomal α-mannosidase, resulting in primary storage of undegraded mannose-rich oligosaccharides. Disease has been described in humans, cattle, cats, mice, and guinea pigs and is characterized in all species by progressive neurologic deterioration and premature death. We analyzed the neurodegenerative processes relative to clinical disease in α-mannosidosis guinea pigs as a human disease model, from birth to end-stage disease. Before the onset of obvious neurologic abnormalities at 2 months, we observed widespread neuronal lysosomal vacuolation including secondary accumulation of GM3 ganglioside, widespread axonal spheroids, and reduced myelination of white matter. Histopathologic changes subsequently showed rapid progression in severity in a pattern common to a number of different lysosomal storage disorders, with additional abnormalities including accumulation of GM2 ganglioside and cholesterol, astrogliosis, neuron loss particularly in the cerebellum, and activation and infiltration of the CNS with microglia/macrophages. End-stage clinical disease was seen at 10 to 14 months of age. Our findings show that complex neuropathologic changes in α-mannosidosis guinea pigs are already present at birth, before clinical changes are evident, and similar events are likely to occur in patients with this disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)687-697
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology
Volume66
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2007

Fingerprint

Mannosidase Deficiency Diseases
Lysosomal Storage Diseases
Pathology
Guinea Pigs
G(M2) Ganglioside
Mannosidases
G(M3) Ganglioside
Parturition
Nervous System Malformations
Premature Mortality
Microglia
Mannose
Oligosaccharides
Cerebellum
Nervous System
Cats
Macrophages
Cholesterol
Neurons

Keywords

  • Animal model
  • Axonal spheroid
  • Cholesterol
  • Ganglioside
  • Glycoproteinosis
  • Guinea pig
  • Lysosome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Developmental analysis of CNS pathology in the lysosomal storage disease α-mannosidosis. / Crawley, Allison C.; Walkley, Steven U.

In: Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology, Vol. 66, No. 8, 08.2007, p. 687-697.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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