Development of microfluidic-based cell collection devices for in vitro and in vivo use

Logan Butt, Dave Entenberg, L. P.Madhubhani Hemachandra, Matthew Strohmayer, Patricia Keely, Julio Aguirre-Ghiso, John S. Condeelis, James Castracane

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The NANIVID - or Nano Intravital Device - is an implantable delivery tool designed to locally affect the tumor microenvironment in vivo. This technology is being redesigned and validated as a cell collection tool for the study of metastatic cancer cells. A methodology has been developed to facilitate this transition, consisting of microfluidic analysis of the device microchannels and a series of cell-related collection experiments building up to in vivo collection. Single-chamber designs were first used to qualitatively demonstrate the feasibility of cell collection ex vivo. This was followed by the development and implementation of devices containing a second, negative-control chamber for quantitative analysis. This work sets the foundation for in vivo cancer cell migration studies utilizing the NANIVID.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMicrofluidics, BioMEMS, and Medical Microsystems XIV
EditorsHolger Becker, Bonnie L. Gray
PublisherSPIE
ISBN (Electronic)9781628419399
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016
Event14th SPIE Photonics West Conference: Microfluidics, BioMEMS, and Medical Microsystems - San Francisco, United States
Duration: Feb 13 2016Feb 15 2016

Publication series

NameProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume9705
ISSN (Print)1605-7422

Other

Other14th SPIE Photonics West Conference: Microfluidics, BioMEMS, and Medical Microsystems
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco
Period2/13/162/15/16

Keywords

  • Microfluidics
  • cancer
  • implantable device
  • invasion
  • metastasis
  • microchannels

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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  • Cite this

    Butt, L., Entenberg, D., Hemachandra, L. P. M., Strohmayer, M., Keely, P., Aguirre-Ghiso, J., Condeelis, J. S., & Castracane, J. (2016). Development of microfluidic-based cell collection devices for in vitro and in vivo use. In H. Becker, & B. L. Gray (Eds.), Microfluidics, BioMEMS, and Medical Microsystems XIV [97051A] (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE; Vol. 9705). SPIE. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2213316