Decoding task engagement from distributed network electrophysiology in humans

Nicole R. Provenza, Angelique C. Paulk, Noam Peled, Maria I. Restrepo, Sydney S. Cash, Darin D. Dougherty, Emad N. Eskandar, David A. Borton, Alik S. Widge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Here, our objective was to develop a binary decoder to detect task engagement in humans during two distinct, conflict-based behavioral tasks. Effortful, goal-directed decision-making requires the coordinated action of multiple cognitive processes, including attention, working memory and action selection. That type of mental effort is often dysfunctional in mental disorders, e.g. when a patient attempts to overcome a depression or anxiety-driven habit but feels unable. If the onset of engagement in this type of focused mental activity could be reliably detected, decisional function might be augmented, e.g. through neurostimulation. However, there are no known algorithms for detecting task engagement with rapid time resolution. APPROACH: We defined a new network measure, fixed canonical correlation (FCCA), specifically suited for neural decoding applications. We extracted FCCA features from local field potential recordings in human volunteers to give a temporally continuous estimate of mental effort, defined by engagement in experimental conflict tasks. MAIN RESULTS: Using a small number of features per participant, we accurately decoded and distinguished task engagement from other mental activities. Further, the decoder distinguished between engagement in two different conflict-based tasks within seconds of their onset. SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate that network-level brain activity can detect specific types of mental efforts. This could form the basis of a responsive intervention strategy for decision-making deficits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalJournal of neural engineering
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 16 2019

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Electrophysiology
Decoding
Decision making
Decision Making
Brain
Short-Term Memory
Data storage equipment
Mental Disorders
Habits
Volunteers
Anxiety
Depression
Conflict (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Provenza, N. R., Paulk, A. C., Peled, N., Restrepo, M. I., Cash, S. S., Dougherty, D. D., ... Widge, A. S. (2019). Decoding task engagement from distributed network electrophysiology in humans. Journal of neural engineering, 16(5). https://doi.org/10.1088/1741-2552/ab2c58

Decoding task engagement from distributed network electrophysiology in humans. / Provenza, Nicole R.; Paulk, Angelique C.; Peled, Noam; Restrepo, Maria I.; Cash, Sydney S.; Dougherty, Darin D.; Eskandar, Emad N.; Borton, David A.; Widge, Alik S.

In: Journal of neural engineering, Vol. 16, No. 5, 16.08.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Provenza, NR, Paulk, AC, Peled, N, Restrepo, MI, Cash, SS, Dougherty, DD, Eskandar, EN, Borton, DA & Widge, AS 2019, 'Decoding task engagement from distributed network electrophysiology in humans', Journal of neural engineering, vol. 16, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/1741-2552/ab2c58
Provenza, Nicole R. ; Paulk, Angelique C. ; Peled, Noam ; Restrepo, Maria I. ; Cash, Sydney S. ; Dougherty, Darin D. ; Eskandar, Emad N. ; Borton, David A. ; Widge, Alik S. / Decoding task engagement from distributed network electrophysiology in humans. In: Journal of neural engineering. 2019 ; Vol. 16, No. 5.
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