De novo solid malignancies after cardiac transplantation

Daniel J. Goldstein, Deborah L. Williams, Mehmet C. Oz, Alan D. Weinberg, Eric A. Rose, Robert E. Michler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background.: As long-term survival after cardiac transplantation improves, neoplastic complications are increasingly being discovered. Although lymphoproliferative disorders predominate, the incidence and clinical spectrum of solid tumors in a uniform population of heart transplant recipients remains uncertain. Methods.: We reviewed our experience with 712 patients who underwent cardiac transplantation. Clinical charts were reviewed and telephone interviews were conducted, when possible. Results.: De novo solid malignancies were identified in 3.3% of patients at risk (21 of 633 patients). Twenty patients were male; mean age was 51.5 ± 8.6 years. Most patients reported a significant smoking history. Pulmonary, urologic, and Kaposi's sarcoma were the most common malignancies identified. Mean interval from transplantation to diagnosis was 35 months. Six patients were diagnosed within 6 months of transplantation. One-year and 5-year survival after transplantation were 90% and 49%, respectively. One-year and 3-year survival after cancer diagnosis were 60% and 52%, respectively. Conclusions.: De novo solid malignancy after transplantation occurred with about half the frequency of lymphoproliferative disorders. A striking male predominance was noted. The interval from transplantation to the appearance of cancer is variable, and no clustering was identified. A significant smoking history warrants aggressive search for occult malignancy during pretransplantation evaluation of potential heart recipients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1783-1789
Number of pages7
JournalThe Annals of thoracic surgery
Volume60
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Heart Transplantation
Transplantation
Neoplasms
Lymphoproliferative Disorders
Survival
Smoking
History
Kaposi's Sarcoma
Cluster Analysis
Interviews
Lung
Incidence
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

De novo solid malignancies after cardiac transplantation. / Goldstein, Daniel J.; Williams, Deborah L.; Oz, Mehmet C.; Weinberg, Alan D.; Rose, Eric A.; Michler, Robert E.

In: The Annals of thoracic surgery, Vol. 60, No. 6, 1995, p. 1783-1789.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goldstein, Daniel J. ; Williams, Deborah L. ; Oz, Mehmet C. ; Weinberg, Alan D. ; Rose, Eric A. ; Michler, Robert E. / De novo solid malignancies after cardiac transplantation. In: The Annals of thoracic surgery. 1995 ; Vol. 60, No. 6. pp. 1783-1789.
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