Cumulative social risk and obesity in early childhood

Shakira F. Suglia, Cristiane S. Duarte, Earle C. Chambers, Renée Boynton-Jarrett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to examine the relationship between cumulative social adversity and childhood obesity among preschool-aged children (N = 1605) in the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. METHODS: Maternal reports of intimate partner violence, food insecurity, housing insecurity, maternal depressive symptoms, maternal substance use, and father's incarceration were obtained when the child was 1 and 3 years of age. Two cumulative social risk scores were created by summing the 6 factors assessed at ages 1 and 3 years. Child height and weight were measured at 5 years of age. Logistic regression models stratified according to gender were used to estimate the association between cumulative social risk and obesity, adjusting for sociodemographic factors. RESULTS: Seventeen percent of children were obese at age 5 years, and 57% had at least 1 social risk factor. Adjusting for sociodemographic factors, girls experiencing high cumulative social risk (≥2 factors) at age 1 year only (odds ratio [OR]: 2.1 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-4.1]) or at 3 years only (OR: 2.2 [95% CI: 1.2-4.2]) were at increased odds of being obese compared with girls with no risk factors at either time point. Those experiencing high cumulative risk at age 1 and 3 years were not at statistically significant odds of being obese (OR: 1.9 [95% CI: 0.9-4.0]). No significant associations were noted among boys. CONCLUSIONS: There seems to be gender differences in the effects of cumulative social risk factors on the prevalence of obesity at 5 years of age. Understanding the social context of families could make for more effective preventive efforts to combat childhood obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatrics
Volume129
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012

Fingerprint

Pediatric Obesity
Odds Ratio
Mothers
Confidence Intervals
Obesity
Logistic Models
Food Supply
Preschool Children
Fathers
Depression
Weights and Measures
Early childhood
Confidence Interval
Risk Factors

Keywords

  • Cumulative risk
  • Food insecurity
  • Housing insecurity
  • Obesity
  • Social risk factors
  • Social stress
  • Violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Cumulative social risk and obesity in early childhood. / Suglia, Shakira F.; Duarte, Cristiane S.; Chambers, Earle C.; Boynton-Jarrett, Renée.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 129, No. 5, 05.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Suglia, Shakira F. ; Duarte, Cristiane S. ; Chambers, Earle C. ; Boynton-Jarrett, Renée. / Cumulative social risk and obesity in early childhood. In: Pediatrics. 2012 ; Vol. 129, No. 5.
@article{9c1581fad46c4321840489f3925c0cd7,
title = "Cumulative social risk and obesity in early childhood",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to examine the relationship between cumulative social adversity and childhood obesity among preschool-aged children (N = 1605) in the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. METHODS: Maternal reports of intimate partner violence, food insecurity, housing insecurity, maternal depressive symptoms, maternal substance use, and father's incarceration were obtained when the child was 1 and 3 years of age. Two cumulative social risk scores were created by summing the 6 factors assessed at ages 1 and 3 years. Child height and weight were measured at 5 years of age. Logistic regression models stratified according to gender were used to estimate the association between cumulative social risk and obesity, adjusting for sociodemographic factors. RESULTS: Seventeen percent of children were obese at age 5 years, and 57{\%} had at least 1 social risk factor. Adjusting for sociodemographic factors, girls experiencing high cumulative social risk (≥2 factors) at age 1 year only (odds ratio [OR]: 2.1 [95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-4.1]) or at 3 years only (OR: 2.2 [95{\%} CI: 1.2-4.2]) were at increased odds of being obese compared with girls with no risk factors at either time point. Those experiencing high cumulative risk at age 1 and 3 years were not at statistically significant odds of being obese (OR: 1.9 [95{\%} CI: 0.9-4.0]). No significant associations were noted among boys. CONCLUSIONS: There seems to be gender differences in the effects of cumulative social risk factors on the prevalence of obesity at 5 years of age. Understanding the social context of families could make for more effective preventive efforts to combat childhood obesity.",
keywords = "Cumulative risk, Food insecurity, Housing insecurity, Obesity, Social risk factors, Social stress, Violence",
author = "Suglia, {Shakira F.} and Duarte, {Cristiane S.} and Chambers, {Earle C.} and Ren{\'e}e Boynton-Jarrett",
year = "2012",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1542/peds.2011-2456",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "129",
journal = "Pediatrics",
issn = "0031-4005",
publisher = "American Academy of Pediatrics",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cumulative social risk and obesity in early childhood

AU - Suglia, Shakira F.

AU - Duarte, Cristiane S.

AU - Chambers, Earle C.

AU - Boynton-Jarrett, Renée

PY - 2012/5

Y1 - 2012/5

N2 - OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to examine the relationship between cumulative social adversity and childhood obesity among preschool-aged children (N = 1605) in the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. METHODS: Maternal reports of intimate partner violence, food insecurity, housing insecurity, maternal depressive symptoms, maternal substance use, and father's incarceration were obtained when the child was 1 and 3 years of age. Two cumulative social risk scores were created by summing the 6 factors assessed at ages 1 and 3 years. Child height and weight were measured at 5 years of age. Logistic regression models stratified according to gender were used to estimate the association between cumulative social risk and obesity, adjusting for sociodemographic factors. RESULTS: Seventeen percent of children were obese at age 5 years, and 57% had at least 1 social risk factor. Adjusting for sociodemographic factors, girls experiencing high cumulative social risk (≥2 factors) at age 1 year only (odds ratio [OR]: 2.1 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-4.1]) or at 3 years only (OR: 2.2 [95% CI: 1.2-4.2]) were at increased odds of being obese compared with girls with no risk factors at either time point. Those experiencing high cumulative risk at age 1 and 3 years were not at statistically significant odds of being obese (OR: 1.9 [95% CI: 0.9-4.0]). No significant associations were noted among boys. CONCLUSIONS: There seems to be gender differences in the effects of cumulative social risk factors on the prevalence of obesity at 5 years of age. Understanding the social context of families could make for more effective preventive efforts to combat childhood obesity.

AB - OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to examine the relationship between cumulative social adversity and childhood obesity among preschool-aged children (N = 1605) in the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. METHODS: Maternal reports of intimate partner violence, food insecurity, housing insecurity, maternal depressive symptoms, maternal substance use, and father's incarceration were obtained when the child was 1 and 3 years of age. Two cumulative social risk scores were created by summing the 6 factors assessed at ages 1 and 3 years. Child height and weight were measured at 5 years of age. Logistic regression models stratified according to gender were used to estimate the association between cumulative social risk and obesity, adjusting for sociodemographic factors. RESULTS: Seventeen percent of children were obese at age 5 years, and 57% had at least 1 social risk factor. Adjusting for sociodemographic factors, girls experiencing high cumulative social risk (≥2 factors) at age 1 year only (odds ratio [OR]: 2.1 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-4.1]) or at 3 years only (OR: 2.2 [95% CI: 1.2-4.2]) were at increased odds of being obese compared with girls with no risk factors at either time point. Those experiencing high cumulative risk at age 1 and 3 years were not at statistically significant odds of being obese (OR: 1.9 [95% CI: 0.9-4.0]). No significant associations were noted among boys. CONCLUSIONS: There seems to be gender differences in the effects of cumulative social risk factors on the prevalence of obesity at 5 years of age. Understanding the social context of families could make for more effective preventive efforts to combat childhood obesity.

KW - Cumulative risk

KW - Food insecurity

KW - Housing insecurity

KW - Obesity

KW - Social risk factors

KW - Social stress

KW - Violence

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84860564822&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84860564822&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1542/peds.2011-2456

DO - 10.1542/peds.2011-2456

M3 - Article

VL - 129

JO - Pediatrics

JF - Pediatrics

SN - 0031-4005

IS - 5

ER -