Correlation of aortic cuspal and aortic root disease with aortic systolic ejection murmurs and with mitral anular calcium in persons older than 62 years in a long-term health care facility

Wilbert S. Aronow, Kenneth S. Schwartz, Mordecai Koenigsberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aortic systolic ejection murmurs (ASM) are common in elderly persons.1,2 Calcific deposits in the aortic valve are common in elderly persons and may lead to aortic stenosis.2,3 Calcific deposits in the aortic valve occurred in 22 of 40 necropsy patients (55%) aged 90 to 103 years.3 Calcium of the aortic valve and mitral anulus (MAC) may coexist.2-5 In addition, aortic cuspal or root thickening (aortic sclerosis) may cause ASM in elderly persons.6 We performed this prospective study to determine the prevalence of ASM, calcified aortic cusps, aortic stenosis and aortic sclerosis, and the correlation of calcified aortic cusps, aortic stenosis and aortic sclerosis with ASM and with MAC in an unselected population of elderly persons older than 62 years in a long-term health care facility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)651-652
Number of pages2
JournalThe American Journal of Cardiology
Volume58
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 1986
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Systolic Murmurs
Aortic Diseases
Health Facilities
Long-Term Care
Calcium
Delivery of Health Care
Sclerosis
Aortic Valve
Aortic Valve Stenosis
Prospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

@article{d6f7b127e58a4ee3acf38499752db48c,
title = "Correlation of aortic cuspal and aortic root disease with aortic systolic ejection murmurs and with mitral anular calcium in persons older than 62 years in a long-term health care facility",
abstract = "Aortic systolic ejection murmurs (ASM) are common in elderly persons.1,2 Calcific deposits in the aortic valve are common in elderly persons and may lead to aortic stenosis.2,3 Calcific deposits in the aortic valve occurred in 22 of 40 necropsy patients (55{\%}) aged 90 to 103 years.3 Calcium of the aortic valve and mitral anulus (MAC) may coexist.2-5 In addition, aortic cuspal or root thickening (aortic sclerosis) may cause ASM in elderly persons.6 We performed this prospective study to determine the prevalence of ASM, calcified aortic cusps, aortic stenosis and aortic sclerosis, and the correlation of calcified aortic cusps, aortic stenosis and aortic sclerosis with ASM and with MAC in an unselected population of elderly persons older than 62 years in a long-term health care facility.",
author = "Aronow, {Wilbert S.} and Schwartz, {Kenneth S.} and Mordecai Koenigsberg",
year = "1986",
month = "9",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/0002-9149(86)90295-X",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "58",
pages = "651--652",
journal = "American Journal of Cardiology",
issn = "0002-9149",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Correlation of aortic cuspal and aortic root disease with aortic systolic ejection murmurs and with mitral anular calcium in persons older than 62 years in a long-term health care facility

AU - Aronow, Wilbert S.

AU - Schwartz, Kenneth S.

AU - Koenigsberg, Mordecai

PY - 1986/9/15

Y1 - 1986/9/15

N2 - Aortic systolic ejection murmurs (ASM) are common in elderly persons.1,2 Calcific deposits in the aortic valve are common in elderly persons and may lead to aortic stenosis.2,3 Calcific deposits in the aortic valve occurred in 22 of 40 necropsy patients (55%) aged 90 to 103 years.3 Calcium of the aortic valve and mitral anulus (MAC) may coexist.2-5 In addition, aortic cuspal or root thickening (aortic sclerosis) may cause ASM in elderly persons.6 We performed this prospective study to determine the prevalence of ASM, calcified aortic cusps, aortic stenosis and aortic sclerosis, and the correlation of calcified aortic cusps, aortic stenosis and aortic sclerosis with ASM and with MAC in an unselected population of elderly persons older than 62 years in a long-term health care facility.

AB - Aortic systolic ejection murmurs (ASM) are common in elderly persons.1,2 Calcific deposits in the aortic valve are common in elderly persons and may lead to aortic stenosis.2,3 Calcific deposits in the aortic valve occurred in 22 of 40 necropsy patients (55%) aged 90 to 103 years.3 Calcium of the aortic valve and mitral anulus (MAC) may coexist.2-5 In addition, aortic cuspal or root thickening (aortic sclerosis) may cause ASM in elderly persons.6 We performed this prospective study to determine the prevalence of ASM, calcified aortic cusps, aortic stenosis and aortic sclerosis, and the correlation of calcified aortic cusps, aortic stenosis and aortic sclerosis with ASM and with MAC in an unselected population of elderly persons older than 62 years in a long-term health care facility.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0022494356&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0022494356&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0002-9149(86)90295-X

DO - 10.1016/0002-9149(86)90295-X

M3 - Article

VL - 58

SP - 651

EP - 652

JO - American Journal of Cardiology

JF - American Journal of Cardiology

SN - 0002-9149

IS - 7

ER -