Correlates of crack abuse among drug-using incarcerated women

Psychological trauma, social support, and coping behavior

Nabila El-Bassel, Louisa Gilbert, Robert F. Schilling, André Ivanoff, Debra Borne, Steven M. Safyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This investigation examines the relationship between psychological trauma and crack abuse among 158 women with a recent history of drug use who were incarcerated in a New York City jail facility. Interviewers obtained data on demographics, drug use, psychological trauma history, criminal history, social support, and coping behavior variables. Three-fourths of the total sample had used crack three or more times a week for a month in the past; a quarter had used other drags, predominantly heroin, three or more times a week for a month in the past. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between adult psychological trauma variables (loss of custody of youngest child and lived in streets prior to arrest) and regular crack use in three sequential models. After adjusting for social support, coping behavior, demographics, and criminal history variables, women who had lost custody of their youngest child were 3.3 times more likely to be regular crack users. Women who demonstrated more negative coping behavior and perceived themselves as having less emotional support were also more likely to be regular crack users. The association between childhood traumas (i.e., childhood sexual abuse, childhood physical abase, parental alcohol abuse) and regular crack use was also assessed using multiple logistic regression; however, no significant associations were found between these childhood psychological traumas and regular crack use in both the unadjusted and adjusted models. Study findings underscore the importance of assessing environmental, interpersonal, and intrapersonal factors in tailoring treatment strategies for users of crack and other drugs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-56
Number of pages16
JournalAmerican Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
Volume22
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1996

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Psychological Adaptation
Social Support
Substance-Related Disorders
Child Custody
Logistic Models
Demography
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Heroin
Sex Offenses
Alcoholism
Regression Analysis
Interviews
Psychological Trauma
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Correlates of crack abuse among drug-using incarcerated women : Psychological trauma, social support, and coping behavior. / El-Bassel, Nabila; Gilbert, Louisa; Schilling, Robert F.; Ivanoff, André; Borne, Debra; Safyer, Steven M.

In: American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, Vol. 22, No. 1, 1996, p. 41-56.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

El-Bassel, Nabila ; Gilbert, Louisa ; Schilling, Robert F. ; Ivanoff, André ; Borne, Debra ; Safyer, Steven M. / Correlates of crack abuse among drug-using incarcerated women : Psychological trauma, social support, and coping behavior. In: American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse. 1996 ; Vol. 22, No. 1. pp. 41-56.
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