Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Perinatal Outcomes Across the Pandemic at an Academic Medical Center in New York City

Christine Leinbach Seaton, Alexa Cohen, Erin M. Henninger, Inessa Gendlina, Wei Hou, Peter S. Bernstein, Tim Q. Duong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate perinatal complications associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection during pregnancy in the four major waves of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in the Bronx, New York. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study included all patients who delivered at a single academic medical center between March 1, 2020, and February 13, 2022. SARS-CoV-2 positivity was defined as a positive SARS-CoV-2 test result during pregnancy. Primary outcomes were preterm birth, low birth weight, stillbirth, cesarean delivery, and preeclampsia associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Secondary analyses examined outcomes by predominant variant at the time of infection. Group differences in categorical variables were tested using χ2 tests. RESULTS: Of the 8,983 patients who delivered, 638 (7.1%) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy. Age, race, ethnicity, and major comorbidities did not differ significantly between the SARS-CoV-2-positive and SARS-CoV-2-negative cohorts (P>.05). Primary outcomes did not differ between the SARS-CoV-2-positive and SARS-CoV-2-negative cohorts (P>.05). There was a marked increase in positive SARS-CoV-2 test results in individuals who gave birth during the Omicron wave (140/449, 31.2%). However, among patients who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection, the preterm birth rate during the Omicron wave (9.9%) was significantly lower than during the original wave (20.3%) and the Alpha (18.4%) wave (P<.05). Vaccination rates were low before the Omicron wave and rose to 47.2% during the Omicron wave among individuals hospitalized with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Finally, second-trimester infection was significantly associated with worse perinatal outcomes compared with third-trimester infection (P<.05). CONCLUSION: There was a general trend toward improvement in preterm birth rates across the pandemic among pregnant patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. The Omicron variant was more infectious, but the preterm birth rate during the Omicron wave was low compared with that during the original wave and the Alpha wave.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)144-151
Number of pages8
JournalObstetrics and gynecology
Volume141
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2023

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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