Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries and concomitant coronary artery and valvular disease in the adult patient

David R. Stern, Craig Steiner, Ricardo A. Bello, Nicole Sutton, Daniel M. Spevack, Galina Leyvi, Robert E. Michler, David A. D'Alessandro, Samuel Weinstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (ccTGA) accounts for less that 1% of cardiac anomalies, and is defined as ventriculoarterial and atrioventricular (AV) discordance. The double discordant connection allows for survival with the right ventricle performing as the systemic ventricle, and the left ventricle as the pulmonary ventricle. We report a case of ccTGA in a 35-year-old male with situs inversus totalis status post repair of a ventricular septal defect (VSD) with a residual VSD, severe systemic AV valve regurgitation, and coronary artery disease who presented with chest pain. He subsequently underwent tricuspid valve replacement and VSD repair, followed by percutaneous coronary revascularization. This case highlights many important issues of adults with congenital cardiac disease, as well as the specific surgical management of anomalies associated with ccTGA. We review the literature and discuss the management of these complicated patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)629-634
Number of pages6
JournalCongenital Heart Disease
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010

Keywords

  • Adult Congenital Heart Disease
  • Congenitally Corrected Transposition of the Great Arteries
  • Coronary Artery Disease
  • Systemic Atrioventricular Valve Regurgitation
  • Ventricular Septal Defect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Surgery
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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