Confirming glycemic status in the diabetes prevention program: Implications for diagnosing diabetes in high risk adults

C. A. Christophi, H. E. Resnick, R. E. Ratner, M. Temprosa, S. Fowler, W. C. Knowler, H. Shamoon, E. Barrett-Connor, S. E. Kahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aims: To examine the ability of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and/or 2-h glucose to confirm diabetes and to determine the proportion of participants with HbA1c ≥ 6.5%. Methods: Diabetes confirmation rates were calculated after a single elevated FPG and/or 2-h glucose on an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) using a confirmatory OGTT performed within 6 weeks. Results: 772 (24%) participants had elevated FPG or 2-h glucose on an OGTT that triggered a confirmation visit. There were 101 triggers on FPG alone, 574 on 2-h glucose alone, and 97 on both. Only 47% of participants who triggered had confirmed diabetes. While the confirmation rate for FPG was higher than that for 2-h glucose, the larger number of 2-h glucose triggers resulted in 87% of confirmed cases triggering on 2-h glucose. Confirmation rates increased to 75% among persons with FPG ≥ 126 mg/dl and HbA1c ≥ 6.5%. Conclusions: Only half of the persons with elevated FPG and IGT were subsequently confirmed to have diabetes. At current diagnostic levels, more persons trigger on 2-h glucose than on FPG, but fewer of these persons have their diagnoses confirmed. In individuals with FPG ≥ 126 mg/dl and HbA1c ≥ 6.5%, the confirmation rate was increased.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-157
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Diabetes and Its Complications
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2013

Keywords

  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Epidemiology
  • Screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

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    Christophi, C. A., Resnick, H. E., Ratner, R. E., Temprosa, M., Fowler, S., Knowler, W. C., Shamoon, H., Barrett-Connor, E., & Kahn, S. E. (2013). Confirming glycemic status in the diabetes prevention program: Implications for diagnosing diabetes in high risk adults. Journal of Diabetes and Its Complications, 27(2), 150-157. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2012.09.012