Computed tomography evaluation in valvular heart disease

Javier Sanz, Leticia Fernández-Friera, Mario J. Garcia

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Valvular heart disease (VHD) affects 2.5% of US adults and predominantly involves the left-sided cardiac structures. Regurgitant lesions are more common than stenoses, and mitral regurgitation (MR) is the most prevalent abnormality [1]. Doppler echocardiography is the initial imaging modality of choice, allowing for a complete diagnosis in the majority of patients [2]. In cases of poor acoustic window and/or disparate results regarding disease severity, additional tests may be required. Cardiac catheterization is a time-honored modality, but limited by its invasive nature. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an excellent noninvasive alternative for both valvular insufficiency and stenosis [3]. Due to the need for radiation and contrast, computed tomography (CT) has a limited role for the evaluation of VHD as the primary indication. It may occasionally be employed as such when echocardiographic results are inconclusive and the patient is not a good candidate for MRI. However, CT is increasingly used for noninvasive coronary angiography, and useful information on valve anatomy and function can simultaneously be obtained from a coronary examination. Also, in patients with primary valve diseases, ruling out obstructive coronary artery disease is deemed a highly appropriate indication and may allow patients to forgo invasive coronary angiography.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCardiac CT Imaging: Diagnosis of Cardiovascular Disease: Second Edition
PublisherSpringer London
Pages159-167
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)9781848826496
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Heart Valve Diseases
Tomography
Coronary Angiography
Pathologic Constriction
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Doppler Echocardiography
Mitral Valve Insufficiency
Cardiac Catheterization
Acoustics
Coronary Artery Disease
Anatomy
Radiation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sanz, J., Fernández-Friera, L., & Garcia, M. J. (2010). Computed tomography evaluation in valvular heart disease. In Cardiac CT Imaging: Diagnosis of Cardiovascular Disease: Second Edition (pp. 159-167). Springer London. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-84882-650-2_14

Computed tomography evaluation in valvular heart disease. / Sanz, Javier; Fernández-Friera, Leticia; Garcia, Mario J.

Cardiac CT Imaging: Diagnosis of Cardiovascular Disease: Second Edition. Springer London, 2010. p. 159-167.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Sanz, J, Fernández-Friera, L & Garcia, MJ 2010, Computed tomography evaluation in valvular heart disease. in Cardiac CT Imaging: Diagnosis of Cardiovascular Disease: Second Edition. Springer London, pp. 159-167. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-84882-650-2_14
Sanz J, Fernández-Friera L, Garcia MJ. Computed tomography evaluation in valvular heart disease. In Cardiac CT Imaging: Diagnosis of Cardiovascular Disease: Second Edition. Springer London. 2010. p. 159-167 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-84882-650-2_14
Sanz, Javier ; Fernández-Friera, Leticia ; Garcia, Mario J. / Computed tomography evaluation in valvular heart disease. Cardiac CT Imaging: Diagnosis of Cardiovascular Disease: Second Edition. Springer London, 2010. pp. 159-167
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