Comparison of Cytobrush and cervicovaginal lavage sampling methods for the detection of genital human papillomavirus

Gary L. Goldberg, Sten H. Vermund, Mark H. Schiffman, Diane B. Ritter, Carol Spitzer, Robert D. Burk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The development of an accurate method for the detection and typing of genital human papillomavirus is of substantial clinical importance. This virus has been implicated as an etiologic agent in the development of cervical neoplasia. To detect human papillomavirus infection with maximum sensitivity, cells must be collected and assayed for human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid. We compared two noninvasive methods of sampling exfoliated cervical cells-cervicovaginal lavage and scrape-Cytobrush. Seventy-four patients newly referred to the colposcopy clinic were divided randomly for cell sampling by either cervicovaginal lavage followed by scrape-Cytobrush or, conversely, scrape-Cytobrush followed by cervicovaginal lavage. Restriction analysis and Southern blot hybridization were used to test all the samples thus obtained for human papillomavirus. Overall, test results from 42 patients (56.8%) were positive for human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid. Twenty-six (21.1%) tested positive for human papillomavirus by both sampling methods, and 22 (42.2%) tested negative for human papillomavirus by both methods. One (1.4%) tested positive with scrape-Cytobrush sampling but negative with cervicovaginal lavage, while 15 (20.2%) tested negative with scrape-Cytobrush but positive with cervicovaginal lavage (p < 0.001, McNemar's test). These data, combined with previous work from our group, suggest that, of the available methods, cervicovaginal lavage, coupled with human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid hybridization, is the most sensitive noninvasive method for harvesting cells for molecular identification of human papillomavirus in the female lower genital tract.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1669-1672
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume161
Issue number6 PART 1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1989

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Therapeutic Irrigation
DNA
Forensic Anthropology
Colposcopy
Papillomavirus Infections
Southern Blotting
Viruses

Keywords

  • cervix diseases
  • epidemiology
  • Papillomavirus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Comparison of Cytobrush and cervicovaginal lavage sampling methods for the detection of genital human papillomavirus. / Goldberg, Gary L.; Vermund, Sten H.; Schiffman, Mark H.; Ritter, Diane B.; Spitzer, Carol; Burk, Robert D.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 161, No. 6 PART 1, 1989, p. 1669-1672.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goldberg, Gary L. ; Vermund, Sten H. ; Schiffman, Mark H. ; Ritter, Diane B. ; Spitzer, Carol ; Burk, Robert D. / Comparison of Cytobrush and cervicovaginal lavage sampling methods for the detection of genital human papillomavirus. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 1989 ; Vol. 161, No. 6 PART 1. pp. 1669-1672.
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abstract = "The development of an accurate method for the detection and typing of genital human papillomavirus is of substantial clinical importance. This virus has been implicated as an etiologic agent in the development of cervical neoplasia. To detect human papillomavirus infection with maximum sensitivity, cells must be collected and assayed for human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid. We compared two noninvasive methods of sampling exfoliated cervical cells-cervicovaginal lavage and scrape-Cytobrush. Seventy-four patients newly referred to the colposcopy clinic were divided randomly for cell sampling by either cervicovaginal lavage followed by scrape-Cytobrush or, conversely, scrape-Cytobrush followed by cervicovaginal lavage. Restriction analysis and Southern blot hybridization were used to test all the samples thus obtained for human papillomavirus. Overall, test results from 42 patients (56.8{\%}) were positive for human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid. Twenty-six (21.1{\%}) tested positive for human papillomavirus by both sampling methods, and 22 (42.2{\%}) tested negative for human papillomavirus by both methods. One (1.4{\%}) tested positive with scrape-Cytobrush sampling but negative with cervicovaginal lavage, while 15 (20.2{\%}) tested negative with scrape-Cytobrush but positive with cervicovaginal lavage (p < 0.001, McNemar's test). These data, combined with previous work from our group, suggest that, of the available methods, cervicovaginal lavage, coupled with human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid hybridization, is the most sensitive noninvasive method for harvesting cells for molecular identification of human papillomavirus in the female lower genital tract.",
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