Comorbid medical illness and relapse of major depressive disorder in the continuation phase of treatment

Dan V. Iosifescu, Andrew A. Nierenberg, Jonathan E. Alpert, George I. Papakostas, Roy H. Perlis, Shamsah Sonawalla, Maurizio Fava

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors examined the impact of comorbid medical illness on the rate of relapse of major depressive disorder during continuation therapy. Subjects (N = 128) with major depressive disorder (according to DSM-III-R criteria) achieved clinical remission (a 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score ≤ 7) after 8 weeks of treatment with fluoxetine and entered the continuation phase of antidepressant treatment. They used the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale to measure the severity of comorbid medical illness. Eight patients (6.3%) relapsed during the 28-week continuation phase. With logistic regression, the total burden and the severity of comorbid medical illness significantly predicted the relapse of major depressive disorder during continuation therapy with fluoxetine. Greater medical comorbidity was also associated with higher increases in self-reported symptoms of depression, anxiety, and anger during the follow-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)419-425
Number of pages7
JournalPsychosomatics
Volume45
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Major Depressive Disorder
Recurrence
Fluoxetine
Depression
Anger
Therapeutics
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Antidepressive Agents
Comorbidity
Anxiety
Logistic Models
Illness
Relapse
Continuation
Therapy
Rating Scales

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Iosifescu, D. V., Nierenberg, A. A., Alpert, J. E., Papakostas, G. I., Perlis, R. H., Sonawalla, S., & Fava, M. (2004). Comorbid medical illness and relapse of major depressive disorder in the continuation phase of treatment. Psychosomatics, 45(5), 419-425. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.psy.45.5.419

Comorbid medical illness and relapse of major depressive disorder in the continuation phase of treatment. / Iosifescu, Dan V.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Alpert, Jonathan E.; Papakostas, George I.; Perlis, Roy H.; Sonawalla, Shamsah; Fava, Maurizio.

In: Psychosomatics, Vol. 45, No. 5, 09.2004, p. 419-425.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Iosifescu, DV, Nierenberg, AA, Alpert, JE, Papakostas, GI, Perlis, RH, Sonawalla, S & Fava, M 2004, 'Comorbid medical illness and relapse of major depressive disorder in the continuation phase of treatment', Psychosomatics, vol. 45, no. 5, pp. 419-425. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.psy.45.5.419
Iosifescu, Dan V. ; Nierenberg, Andrew A. ; Alpert, Jonathan E. ; Papakostas, George I. ; Perlis, Roy H. ; Sonawalla, Shamsah ; Fava, Maurizio. / Comorbid medical illness and relapse of major depressive disorder in the continuation phase of treatment. In: Psychosomatics. 2004 ; Vol. 45, No. 5. pp. 419-425.
@article{a9873375927b4bae8cf4eb4754f56112,
title = "Comorbid medical illness and relapse of major depressive disorder in the continuation phase of treatment",
abstract = "The authors examined the impact of comorbid medical illness on the rate of relapse of major depressive disorder during continuation therapy. Subjects (N = 128) with major depressive disorder (according to DSM-III-R criteria) achieved clinical remission (a 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score ≤ 7) after 8 weeks of treatment with fluoxetine and entered the continuation phase of antidepressant treatment. They used the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale to measure the severity of comorbid medical illness. Eight patients (6.3{\%}) relapsed during the 28-week continuation phase. With logistic regression, the total burden and the severity of comorbid medical illness significantly predicted the relapse of major depressive disorder during continuation therapy with fluoxetine. Greater medical comorbidity was also associated with higher increases in self-reported symptoms of depression, anxiety, and anger during the follow-up.",
author = "Iosifescu, {Dan V.} and Nierenberg, {Andrew A.} and Alpert, {Jonathan E.} and Papakostas, {George I.} and Perlis, {Roy H.} and Shamsah Sonawalla and Maurizio Fava",
year = "2004",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1176/appi.psy.45.5.419",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "45",
pages = "419--425",
journal = "Psychosomatics",
issn = "0033-3182",
publisher = "American Psychiatric Publishing Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comorbid medical illness and relapse of major depressive disorder in the continuation phase of treatment

AU - Iosifescu, Dan V.

AU - Nierenberg, Andrew A.

AU - Alpert, Jonathan E.

AU - Papakostas, George I.

AU - Perlis, Roy H.

AU - Sonawalla, Shamsah

AU - Fava, Maurizio

PY - 2004/9

Y1 - 2004/9

N2 - The authors examined the impact of comorbid medical illness on the rate of relapse of major depressive disorder during continuation therapy. Subjects (N = 128) with major depressive disorder (according to DSM-III-R criteria) achieved clinical remission (a 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score ≤ 7) after 8 weeks of treatment with fluoxetine and entered the continuation phase of antidepressant treatment. They used the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale to measure the severity of comorbid medical illness. Eight patients (6.3%) relapsed during the 28-week continuation phase. With logistic regression, the total burden and the severity of comorbid medical illness significantly predicted the relapse of major depressive disorder during continuation therapy with fluoxetine. Greater medical comorbidity was also associated with higher increases in self-reported symptoms of depression, anxiety, and anger during the follow-up.

AB - The authors examined the impact of comorbid medical illness on the rate of relapse of major depressive disorder during continuation therapy. Subjects (N = 128) with major depressive disorder (according to DSM-III-R criteria) achieved clinical remission (a 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score ≤ 7) after 8 weeks of treatment with fluoxetine and entered the continuation phase of antidepressant treatment. They used the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale to measure the severity of comorbid medical illness. Eight patients (6.3%) relapsed during the 28-week continuation phase. With logistic regression, the total burden and the severity of comorbid medical illness significantly predicted the relapse of major depressive disorder during continuation therapy with fluoxetine. Greater medical comorbidity was also associated with higher increases in self-reported symptoms of depression, anxiety, and anger during the follow-up.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=3142745792&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=3142745792&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1176/appi.psy.45.5.419

DO - 10.1176/appi.psy.45.5.419

M3 - Article

VL - 45

SP - 419

EP - 425

JO - Psychosomatics

JF - Psychosomatics

SN - 0033-3182

IS - 5

ER -