Colony-stimulating factor-1 in immunity and inflammation

Violeta Chitu, E. Richard Stanley

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

395 Scopus citations

Abstract

Colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1, also known as macrophage-CSF) is the primary regulator of the survival, proliferation, differentiation and function of mononuclear phagocytes. Studies that involve CSF-1-deficient mice demonstrate that there is a variable requirement for CSF-1 in the development of individual mononuclear phagocyte populations. However, these cells uniformly express the CSF-1 receptor, and their morphology, phagocytosis and responsiveness to infectious and non-infectious stimuli is regulated by CSF-1. CSF-1 plays important roles in innate immunity, cancer and inflammatory diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, arthritis, atherosclerosis and obesity. In several conditions, activation of macrophages involves a CSF-1 autocrine loop. In addition, secreted and cell-surface isoforms of CSF-1 can have differential effects in inflammation and immunity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-48
Number of pages10
JournalCurrent Opinion in Immunology
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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