Clinical studies examining the impact of obesity on breast cancer risk and prognosis

Rishi Jain, Howard Strickler, Eugene Fine, Joseph A. Sparano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obesity is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, and increased risk of recurrence in women who develop breast cancer. Evidence suggests that the risk of estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer is increased in obese postmenopausal women, whereas in premenopausal women the risk of triple negative breast cancer is increased. Nonetheless, the presence of obesity at diagnosis, and possibly weight gain after diagnosis, may independently contribute to an individual's risk of recurrence of both pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer. Factors associated with adiposity that are likely contributing factors include hyperinsulinemia, inflammation, and relative hyperestrogenemia. Some studies suggest that some aromatase inhibitors may be less effective in obese women than lean women. Clinical trials have evaluated pharmacologic (eg, metformin) and dietary/lifestyle interventions to reduce breast cancer recurrence, although these interventions have not been tested in obese women who may be most likely to benefit from them. Further research is required in order to identify adiposity-associated factors driving recurrence, and design clinical trials to specifically test interventions in obese women at highest risk of recurrence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)257-266
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Mammary Gland Biology and Neoplasia
Volume18
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013

Fingerprint

Obesity
Breast Neoplasms
Recurrence
Adiposity
Clinical Trials
Triple Negative Breast Neoplasms
Aromatase Inhibitors
Metformin
Hyperinsulinism
Clinical Studies
Estrogen Receptors
Weight Gain
Life Style
Inflammation
Research

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Breast cancer
  • Obesity
  • Prognosis
  • Recurrence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Clinical studies examining the impact of obesity on breast cancer risk and prognosis. / Jain, Rishi; Strickler, Howard; Fine, Eugene; Sparano, Joseph A.

In: Journal of Mammary Gland Biology and Neoplasia, Vol. 18, No. 3-4, 12.2013, p. 257-266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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