Chlamydia trachomatis, herpes simplex virus 2, and human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 are not associated with grade of cervical neoplasia in Jamaican colposcopy patients

Philip E. Castle, Carlos Escoffery, Julius Schachter, Carole Rattray, Mark Schiffman, Jeanne Moncada, Karlyn Sugai, Claudette Brown, Beverly Cranston, Barrie Hanchard, Joel M. Palefsky, Robert D. Burk, Martha L. Hutchinson, Howard D. Strickler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: A few recent studies have suggested that other sexually transmitted infections may increase the likelihood of a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection progressing to high-grade cervical neoplasia and cancer. Goal: The goal was to assess whether exposures to Chlamydia trachomatis, human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-I), and/or human simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) are greater in colposcopy patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or cancer (CIN3+) than in patients with low-grade cervical neoplasia (CIN1). Study Design: Sequential patients (n = 447) attending a colposcopy clinic in Kingston, Jamaica, a country with high cervical cancer rates and high HTLV-I prevalence, were tested for (1) HPV DNA by L1 consensus primer (MY09/11) polymerase chain reaction assays, (2) C trachomatis DNA by ligase chain reaction, (3) C trachomatis antibodies by both microimmunofluorescence and a peptide (VS4) enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), (4) HTLV-I antibodies by ELISA confirmed by western blotting, and (5) HSV-2 antibodies by a recombinant HSV-2-specific ELISA. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated with use of multinomial logistic regression models. Results: HPV DNA detection was associated with grade of cervical neoplasia but other evaluated sexually transmitted infections were not. Conclusions: HTLV-I, C trachomatis, and/or HSV-2 were not associated with severity of cervical neoplasia in Jamaican women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)575-580
Number of pages6
JournalSexually Transmitted Diseases
Volume30
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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    Castle, P. E., Escoffery, C., Schachter, J., Rattray, C., Schiffman, M., Moncada, J., Sugai, K., Brown, C., Cranston, B., Hanchard, B., Palefsky, J. M., Burk, R. D., Hutchinson, M. L., & Strickler, H. D. (2003). Chlamydia trachomatis, herpes simplex virus 2, and human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 are not associated with grade of cervical neoplasia in Jamaican colposcopy patients. Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 30(7), 575-580. https://doi.org/10.1097/00007435-200307000-00009