Chemical methods to detect S-nitrosation

Hua Wang, Ming Xian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nitric oxide (NO) is a cell-signaling molecule involved in a number of physiological and pathophysiological processes. Modification of cysteine residues by NO (or NO metabolites), that is S-nitrosation, changes the function of a broad spectrum of proteins. This reaction represents an important post-translational modification that transduces NO-dependent signals. However, the detection and quantification of S-nitrosation in biological samples remain a challenge mainly because of the lability of S-nitrosation products: S-nitrosothiols (SNO). In this review we summarize recent developments of the methods to detect S-nitrosation. Our focus is on the methods which can be used to directly conjugate the site(s) of S-nitrosation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)32-37
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Chemical Biology
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Nitrosation
Nitric Oxide
S-Nitrosothiols
Physiological Phenomena
Cell signaling
Post Translational Protein Processing
Metabolites
Cysteine
Molecules
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Analytical Chemistry

Cite this

Chemical methods to detect S-nitrosation. / Wang, Hua; Xian, Ming.

In: Current Opinion in Chemical Biology, Vol. 15, No. 1, 02.2011, p. 32-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Hua ; Xian, Ming. / Chemical methods to detect S-nitrosation. In: Current Opinion in Chemical Biology. 2011 ; Vol. 15, No. 1. pp. 32-37.
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