CCR2 genotype and disease progression in a treated population of HIV type 1-infected women

Sean Philpott, Harold Burger, Patrick M. Tarwater, Ming Lu, Stephen J. Gange, Kathryn Anastos, Mardge Cohen, Ruth M. Greenblatt, Andrea Kovacs, Howard Minkoff, Mary Young, Paolo Miotti, Michelle Dupuis, Barbara Weiser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Both antiretroviral therapy and the human coreceptor polymorphism CCR2-V64I slow progression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) disease. To examine the effect of V64I on disease progression in patients receiving therapy, we determined CCR2 genotypes in the Women's Interagency HIV Study cohort. We studied 2047 HIV-1-infected women, most of whom initiated treatment during the study. No association was seen between CCR2 genotype and either disease progression or therapeutic response, suggesting that the benefits of treatment most likely overshadow the salutary effects of the V64I polymorphism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)861-865
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume39
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2004

    Fingerprint

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Philpott, S., Burger, H., Tarwater, P. M., Lu, M., Gange, S. J., Anastos, K., Cohen, M., Greenblatt, R. M., Kovacs, A., Minkoff, H., Young, M., Miotti, P., Dupuis, M., & Weiser, B. (2004). CCR2 genotype and disease progression in a treated population of HIV type 1-infected women. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 39(6), 861-865. https://doi.org/10.1086/423386