Cardiogenic and Aortogenic Brain Embolism

Eleni Doufekias, Alan Z. Segal, Jorge Kizer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cardioaortic brain embolism is a potentially devastating condition that presents frequent diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. In this report, we review key aspects of the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of cardiogenic and aortogenic stroke. Emphasis is on advances in diagnostic imaging capabilities and on recent literature addressing secondary prevention for specific cardioembolic sources, upon which diagnosis and prognosis primarily depend. While early evaluation with modern neuroimaging techniques offers to enhance diagnostic accuracy, additional study is required to define optimal utilization. Appropriate imaging of the heart and aorta is paramount to identifying potential sources of embolism. Secondary prevention for high-risk embolic sources generally involves anticoagulation, but immediate initiation of anticoagulation is not routinely indicated. Medium-risk sources have more modest or undefined risks and little randomized comparative evidence to guide management, but antiplatelet therapy is generally favored. One possible exception is patent foramen ovale, for which high-risk features may warrant anticoagulation or mechanical closure. Definitive recommendations for this and other findings await completion of ongoing clinical trials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1049-1059
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume51
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 18 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Intracranial Embolism
Secondary Prevention
Patent Foramen Ovale
Diagnostic Imaging
Embolism
Neuroimaging
Aorta
Therapeutics
Stroke
Clinical Trials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Cardiogenic and Aortogenic Brain Embolism. / Doufekias, Eleni; Segal, Alan Z.; Kizer, Jorge.

In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Vol. 51, No. 11, 18.03.2008, p. 1049-1059.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Doufekias, Eleni ; Segal, Alan Z. ; Kizer, Jorge. / Cardiogenic and Aortogenic Brain Embolism. In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 2008 ; Vol. 51, No. 11. pp. 1049-1059.
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