Capgras' syndrome in dementia with Lewy bodies

Andrew G. Marantz, Joe Verghese

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report the occurrence of Capgras' syndrome, or the delusion of doubles, in a patient with dementia with Lewy bodies. The patient believed that several similar-looking impostors had replaced his wife of over 50 years. Uncharacteristically, he adopted a friendly attitude with these impostors. This unusual convivial reaction to the impostors may result from differential involvement of the dual visual pathways processing facial recognition and emotional responses to faces. The delusion resolved spontaneously, coincident with worsening of the dementia. In a retrospective chart review of 18 autopsy-confirmed cases of dementia with Lewy bodies, delusions were reported in 5 subjects (27.8%), of whom 1 had misidentification delusions much like Capgras' syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)239-241
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume15
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 2002

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Capgras Syndrome
Lewy Body Disease
Delusions
Visual Pathways
Spouses
Dementia
Autopsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Capgras' syndrome in dementia with Lewy bodies. / Marantz, Andrew G.; Verghese, Joe.

In: Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, Vol. 15, No. 4, 12.2002, p. 239-241.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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