Black Race Is Associated with a Lower Risk of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

Prematurity and Respiratory Outcome Program (PROP) Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: To use a large current prospective cohort of infants <29 weeks to compare bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) rates in black and white infants. Study design: The Prematurity and Respiratory Outcome Program (PROP) enrolled 835 infants born in 2011-2013 at <29 weeks of gestation; 728 black or white infants survived to 36 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA). Logistic regression was used to compare BPD outcomes (defined as supplemental oxygen requirement at 36 weeks PMA) between the races, adjusted for gestational age (GA), antenatal steroid use, intubation at birth, and surfactant use at birth. Results: Of 707 black or white infants with available BPD outcomes, BPD was lower in black infants (38% vs 45%), even though they were of significantly lower GA. At every GA, BPD was more common in white infants. The aOR for BPD was 0.60 (95% CI, 0.42-0.85; P =.004) for black infants compared with white infants after adjusting for GA. Despite the lower rate of BPD, black infants had a higher rate of first-year post-prematurity respiratory disease (black, 79%; white, 63%). Conclusions: In this large cohort of recently born preterm infants at <29 weeks GA, compared with white infants, black infants had a lower risk of BPD but an increased risk of persistent respiratory morbidity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)130-135.e2
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume207
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

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Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia
Gestational Age
Parturition
Intubation
Premature Infants
Surface-Active Agents
Logistic Models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Prematurity and Respiratory Outcome Program (PROP) Investigators (2019). Black Race Is Associated with a Lower Risk of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia. Journal of Pediatrics, 207, 130-135.e2. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.11.025

Black Race Is Associated with a Lower Risk of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia. / Prematurity and Respiratory Outcome Program (PROP) Investigators.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 207, 01.04.2019, p. 130-135.e2.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Prematurity and Respiratory Outcome Program (PROP) Investigators 2019, 'Black Race Is Associated with a Lower Risk of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia', Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 207, pp. 130-135.e2. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.11.025
Prematurity and Respiratory Outcome Program (PROP) Investigators. Black Race Is Associated with a Lower Risk of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia. Journal of Pediatrics. 2019 Apr 1;207:130-135.e2. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.11.025
Prematurity and Respiratory Outcome Program (PROP) Investigators. / Black Race Is Associated with a Lower Risk of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2019 ; Vol. 207. pp. 130-135.e2.
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abstract = "Objective: To use a large current prospective cohort of infants <29 weeks to compare bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) rates in black and white infants. Study design: The Prematurity and Respiratory Outcome Program (PROP) enrolled 835 infants born in 2011-2013 at <29 weeks of gestation; 728 black or white infants survived to 36 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA). Logistic regression was used to compare BPD outcomes (defined as supplemental oxygen requirement at 36 weeks PMA) between the races, adjusted for gestational age (GA), antenatal steroid use, intubation at birth, and surfactant use at birth. Results: Of 707 black or white infants with available BPD outcomes, BPD was lower in black infants (38{\%} vs 45{\%}), even though they were of significantly lower GA. At every GA, BPD was more common in white infants. The aOR for BPD was 0.60 (95{\%} CI, 0.42-0.85; P =.004) for black infants compared with white infants after adjusting for GA. Despite the lower rate of BPD, black infants had a higher rate of first-year post-prematurity respiratory disease (black, 79{\%}; white, 63{\%}). Conclusions: In this large cohort of recently born preterm infants at <29 weeks GA, compared with white infants, black infants had a lower risk of BPD but an increased risk of persistent respiratory morbidity.",
author = "{Prematurity and Respiratory Outcome Program (PROP) Investigators} and Ryan, {Rita M.} and Rui Feng and Catalina Bazacliu and Ferkol, {Thomas W.} and Ren, {Clement L.} and Mariani, {Thomas J.} and Poindexter, {Brenda B.} and Fan Wang and Moore, {Paul E.} and Claire Chougnet and Greenberg, {James M.} and William Hardie and Jobe, {Alan H.} and Karen McDowell and Aaron Hamvas and Holland, {Mark R.} and James Kemp and Levy, {Philip T.} and Christopher McPherson and Phillip Tarr and Singh, {Gautam K.} and Barbara Warner and Ballard, {Philip L.} and Ballard, {Roberta A.} and Durand, {David J.} and Eichenwald, {Eric C.} and Khan, {Amir M.} and Leslie Lusk and Merrill, {Jeffrey D.} and Nielson, {Dennis W.} and Rogers, {Elizabeth E.} and Aschner, {Judy L.} and Candice Fike and Scott Guthrie and Tina Hartert and Nathalie Maitre and Marshall Summar and D'Angio, {Carl T.} and Vasanth Kumar and Gloria Pryhuber and Reynolds, {Anne Marie} and Kristin Scheible and Timothy Stevens and Cotten, {C. Michael} and Kim Fisher and Jack Sharp and Voynow, {Judith A.} and Stephanie Davis and Bellamy, {Scarlett A.} and Jonas Ellenberg",
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AU - Prematurity and Respiratory Outcome Program (PROP) Investigators

AU - Ryan, Rita M.

AU - Feng, Rui

AU - Bazacliu, Catalina

AU - Ferkol, Thomas W.

AU - Ren, Clement L.

AU - Mariani, Thomas J.

AU - Poindexter, Brenda B.

AU - Wang, Fan

AU - Moore, Paul E.

AU - Chougnet, Claire

AU - Greenberg, James M.

AU - Hardie, William

AU - Jobe, Alan H.

AU - McDowell, Karen

AU - Hamvas, Aaron

AU - Holland, Mark R.

AU - Kemp, James

AU - Levy, Philip T.

AU - McPherson, Christopher

AU - Tarr, Phillip

AU - Singh, Gautam K.

AU - Warner, Barbara

AU - Ballard, Philip L.

AU - Ballard, Roberta A.

AU - Durand, David J.

AU - Eichenwald, Eric C.

AU - Khan, Amir M.

AU - Lusk, Leslie

AU - Merrill, Jeffrey D.

AU - Nielson, Dennis W.

AU - Rogers, Elizabeth E.

AU - Aschner, Judy L.

AU - Fike, Candice

AU - Guthrie, Scott

AU - Hartert, Tina

AU - Maitre, Nathalie

AU - Summar, Marshall

AU - D'Angio, Carl T.

AU - Kumar, Vasanth

AU - Pryhuber, Gloria

AU - Reynolds, Anne Marie

AU - Scheible, Kristin

AU - Stevens, Timothy

AU - Cotten, C. Michael

AU - Fisher, Kim

AU - Sharp, Jack

AU - Voynow, Judith A.

AU - Davis, Stephanie

AU - Bellamy, Scarlett A.

AU - Ellenberg, Jonas

PY - 2019/4/1

Y1 - 2019/4/1

N2 - Objective: To use a large current prospective cohort of infants <29 weeks to compare bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) rates in black and white infants. Study design: The Prematurity and Respiratory Outcome Program (PROP) enrolled 835 infants born in 2011-2013 at <29 weeks of gestation; 728 black or white infants survived to 36 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA). Logistic regression was used to compare BPD outcomes (defined as supplemental oxygen requirement at 36 weeks PMA) between the races, adjusted for gestational age (GA), antenatal steroid use, intubation at birth, and surfactant use at birth. Results: Of 707 black or white infants with available BPD outcomes, BPD was lower in black infants (38% vs 45%), even though they were of significantly lower GA. At every GA, BPD was more common in white infants. The aOR for BPD was 0.60 (95% CI, 0.42-0.85; P =.004) for black infants compared with white infants after adjusting for GA. Despite the lower rate of BPD, black infants had a higher rate of first-year post-prematurity respiratory disease (black, 79%; white, 63%). Conclusions: In this large cohort of recently born preterm infants at <29 weeks GA, compared with white infants, black infants had a lower risk of BPD but an increased risk of persistent respiratory morbidity.

AB - Objective: To use a large current prospective cohort of infants <29 weeks to compare bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) rates in black and white infants. Study design: The Prematurity and Respiratory Outcome Program (PROP) enrolled 835 infants born in 2011-2013 at <29 weeks of gestation; 728 black or white infants survived to 36 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA). Logistic regression was used to compare BPD outcomes (defined as supplemental oxygen requirement at 36 weeks PMA) between the races, adjusted for gestational age (GA), antenatal steroid use, intubation at birth, and surfactant use at birth. Results: Of 707 black or white infants with available BPD outcomes, BPD was lower in black infants (38% vs 45%), even though they were of significantly lower GA. At every GA, BPD was more common in white infants. The aOR for BPD was 0.60 (95% CI, 0.42-0.85; P =.004) for black infants compared with white infants after adjusting for GA. Despite the lower rate of BPD, black infants had a higher rate of first-year post-prematurity respiratory disease (black, 79%; white, 63%). Conclusions: In this large cohort of recently born preterm infants at <29 weeks GA, compared with white infants, black infants had a lower risk of BPD but an increased risk of persistent respiratory morbidity.

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DO - 10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.11.025

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VL - 207

SP - 130-135.e2

JO - Journal of Pediatrics

JF - Journal of Pediatrics

SN - 0022-3476

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