Biology of Falls: Preliminary Cohort Study Suggesting a Possible Role for Oxidative Stress

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Abstract

Background: Biological underpinnings of falls in older adults are not well established. Objectives: To examine the validity of selected oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers for predicting incident falls in community-dwelling older adults. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting And Participants: 266 non-demented and ambulatory community-dwelling older adults (mean age 78 years, 55% women). Measurements: Oxidative stress (malondialdehyde) and inflammatory (interleukin-6 [IL-6]) biomarkers were selected based on associations with fall risk factors, and values were log-transformed to account for non-normal distributions. Results: Over a mean follow-up of 20.5 ± 10.1 months, 119 participants fell. In Cox proportional hazards models, each one standard deviation increase in baseline log-malondialdehyde levels predicted incident falls (Hazard ratio (HR) adjusted for age, gender, education, comorbidity count, medications, log-IL-6 levels, prior falls, depressive symptoms, cognitive status, gait velocity, and balance 1.53, 95% CI 1.11-2.16). Log-IL-6 levels were not associated with falls. Participants in the highest log-malondialdehyde quartile at baseline had increased risk for incident falls than those in the lowest quartile (HR 2.47, 95% CI 1.41-4.34). Conclusion: Oxidative stress predicted falls in a community-based cohort, and should be further examined as a fall risk biomarker as well as a potential target to prevent falls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

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Malondialdehyde
Independent Living
Interleukin-6
Oxidative Stress
Cohort Studies
Biomarkers
Gait
Proportional Hazards Models
Comorbidity
Prospective Studies
Depression
Education

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Falls
  • Inflammation
  • Oxidative stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

@article{1d01f8e1d51b4a23bd93276f67c04729,
title = "Biology of Falls: Preliminary Cohort Study Suggesting a Possible Role for Oxidative Stress",
abstract = "Background: Biological underpinnings of falls in older adults are not well established. Objectives: To examine the validity of selected oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers for predicting incident falls in community-dwelling older adults. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting And Participants: 266 non-demented and ambulatory community-dwelling older adults (mean age 78 years, 55{\%} women). Measurements: Oxidative stress (malondialdehyde) and inflammatory (interleukin-6 [IL-6]) biomarkers were selected based on associations with fall risk factors, and values were log-transformed to account for non-normal distributions. Results: Over a mean follow-up of 20.5 ± 10.1 months, 119 participants fell. In Cox proportional hazards models, each one standard deviation increase in baseline log-malondialdehyde levels predicted incident falls (Hazard ratio (HR) adjusted for age, gender, education, comorbidity count, medications, log-IL-6 levels, prior falls, depressive symptoms, cognitive status, gait velocity, and balance 1.53, 95{\%} CI 1.11-2.16). Log-IL-6 levels were not associated with falls. Participants in the highest log-malondialdehyde quartile at baseline had increased risk for incident falls than those in the lowest quartile (HR 2.47, 95{\%} CI 1.41-4.34). Conclusion: Oxidative stress predicted falls in a community-based cohort, and should be further examined as a fall risk biomarker as well as a potential target to prevent falls.",
keywords = "Aging, Falls, Inflammation, Oxidative stress",
author = "Joe Verghese and Ayers, {Emmeline I.}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1111/jgs.14822",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of the American Geriatrics Society",
issn = "0002-8614",
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AU - Verghese, Joe

AU - Ayers, Emmeline I.

PY - 2017

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N2 - Background: Biological underpinnings of falls in older adults are not well established. Objectives: To examine the validity of selected oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers for predicting incident falls in community-dwelling older adults. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting And Participants: 266 non-demented and ambulatory community-dwelling older adults (mean age 78 years, 55% women). Measurements: Oxidative stress (malondialdehyde) and inflammatory (interleukin-6 [IL-6]) biomarkers were selected based on associations with fall risk factors, and values were log-transformed to account for non-normal distributions. Results: Over a mean follow-up of 20.5 ± 10.1 months, 119 participants fell. In Cox proportional hazards models, each one standard deviation increase in baseline log-malondialdehyde levels predicted incident falls (Hazard ratio (HR) adjusted for age, gender, education, comorbidity count, medications, log-IL-6 levels, prior falls, depressive symptoms, cognitive status, gait velocity, and balance 1.53, 95% CI 1.11-2.16). Log-IL-6 levels were not associated with falls. Participants in the highest log-malondialdehyde quartile at baseline had increased risk for incident falls than those in the lowest quartile (HR 2.47, 95% CI 1.41-4.34). Conclusion: Oxidative stress predicted falls in a community-based cohort, and should be further examined as a fall risk biomarker as well as a potential target to prevent falls.

AB - Background: Biological underpinnings of falls in older adults are not well established. Objectives: To examine the validity of selected oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers for predicting incident falls in community-dwelling older adults. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting And Participants: 266 non-demented and ambulatory community-dwelling older adults (mean age 78 years, 55% women). Measurements: Oxidative stress (malondialdehyde) and inflammatory (interleukin-6 [IL-6]) biomarkers were selected based on associations with fall risk factors, and values were log-transformed to account for non-normal distributions. Results: Over a mean follow-up of 20.5 ± 10.1 months, 119 participants fell. In Cox proportional hazards models, each one standard deviation increase in baseline log-malondialdehyde levels predicted incident falls (Hazard ratio (HR) adjusted for age, gender, education, comorbidity count, medications, log-IL-6 levels, prior falls, depressive symptoms, cognitive status, gait velocity, and balance 1.53, 95% CI 1.11-2.16). Log-IL-6 levels were not associated with falls. Participants in the highest log-malondialdehyde quartile at baseline had increased risk for incident falls than those in the lowest quartile (HR 2.47, 95% CI 1.41-4.34). Conclusion: Oxidative stress predicted falls in a community-based cohort, and should be further examined as a fall risk biomarker as well as a potential target to prevent falls.

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