Attitudes and behaviour of junior hospital doctors in initiating behavioural change amongst hospitalized patients

A. J. Radford, Thomas E. Rohan, J. C B Litt, S. S. Wald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study addresses the attitudes and behaviours of junior hospital doctors regarding the smoking, alcohol consumption and weight levels of their patients. A survey was made of the case notes of one hundred consecutive general medical, surgical and gynaecological patients and fifty consecutive obstetric patients from a public hospital, where medical records are set out in a problem oriented fashion. Amongst the general patients, one third of the casenotes lacked any record of smoking habit (the proportion was one tenth for obstetric patients) and none included any action in the management plan of those who smoked. Similarly, less than a half of the general patients (and one-tenth of obstetric patients) had any record of alcohol consumption made and for none was it quantified. Of general patients, only five of fifteen obese patients had their obesity level recorded and for only two was it problem tested. For only one was there any evidence of any action being recommended. The pattern was similar with obstetric patients. Discussion centres around the knowledge of junior hospital doctors concerning programmes available which are directed at behavioural change, their level of success, and the reasons given for failing to record or take positive action with respect to these three areas for which primary prevention may be effective. Attention is also directed to strategies for improving the situation which it is believed remains a general feature of hospital practice in Australia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-26
Number of pages8
JournalCommunity Health Studies
Volume9
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1985
Externally publishedYes

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Obstetrics
Alcohol Drinking
Smoking
Hospital Records
Public Hospitals
Primary Prevention
General Hospitals
Habits
Medical Records
Obesity
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Attitudes and behaviour of junior hospital doctors in initiating behavioural change amongst hospitalized patients. / Radford, A. J.; Rohan, Thomas E.; Litt, J. C B; Wald, S. S.

In: Community Health Studies, Vol. 9, No. 1, 1985, p. 19-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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