Associations of structural and functional social support with diabetes prevalence in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos: Results from the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study

Linda C. Gallo, Addie L. Fortmann, Jessica L. McCurley, Carmen R. Isasi, Frank J. Penedo, Martha L. Daviglus, Scott C. Roesch, Gregory A. Talavera, Natalia Gouskova, Franklyn Gonzalez, Neil Schneiderman, Mercedes R. Carnethon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Little research has examined associations of social support with diabetes (or other physical health outcomes) in Hispanics, who are at elevated risk. We examined associations between social support and diabetes prevalence in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Participants were 5,181 adults, 18–74 years old, representing diverse Hispanic backgrounds, who underwent baseline exam with fasting blood draw, oral glucose tolerance test, medication review, sociodemographic assessment, and sociocultural exam with functional and structural social support measures. In adjusted analyses, one standard deviation higher structural and functional social support related to 16 and 15 % lower odds, respectively, of having diabetes. Structural and functional support were related to both previously diagnosed diabetes (OR =.84 and.88, respectively) and newly recognized diabetes prevalence (OR = .84 and.83, respectively). Higher functional and structural social support are associated with lower diabetes prevalence in Hispanics/Latinos.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)160-170
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Hispanic
  • Latino
  • Prevalence
  • Risk factor
  • Social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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