Associations between perceived neighborhood environment and cognitive function among middle-aged and older women and men: Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study

Mayra L. Estrella, Ramon A. Durazo-Arvizu, Linda C. Gallo, Carmen R. Isasi, Krista M. Perreira, Thanh Huyen T. Vu, Elizabeth Vasquez, Shruti Sachdeva, Donglin Zeng, Maria M. Llabre, Wassim Tarraf, Hector M. González, Martha L. Daviglus, Melissa Lamar

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Abstract

Purpose: To examine cross-sectional associations between perceived neighborhood environment and cognitive function among middle-aged and older Hispanic/Latino women and men. Methods: Data from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (2008–2011) and its Sociocultural Ancillary Study (2009–2010) were used. Participants were Hispanic/Latino women (n = 1812) and men (n = 1034) aged 45–74 years. Survey-weighted linear regression models were used to examine associations between self-reported perceived neighborhood environment (i.e., neighborhood social cohesion and problems categorized as quintiles, and neighborhood safety from crime categorized as low, medium, or high) with cognitive function (i.e., global cognition, verbal learning, memory, verbal fluency, and processing speed scores) in women and men. Final model adjusted for age, Hispanic/Latino background, language, field site, household income, education, years lived in neighborhood, and depressive symptoms. Results: Women in the lowest quintile of perceived neighborhood problems (vs. highest quintile) had higher global cognition (β 0.48, 95% CI 0.03, 0.94, p trend 0.229) and memory scores (0.60, 95% CI 0.11, 1.09, p trend: 0.060). Women in the highest quintile of perceived neighborhood social cohesion (vs. lowest quintile) had lower global cognition (β − 0.56, 95% CI − 1.02, − 0.09, p trend 0.004), verbal learning (B − 1.01, 95% CI − 2.00, − 0.03, p trend 0.015), verbal fluency (B − 2.00, 95% CI − 3.83, − 0.16, p trend 0.006), and processing speed (B − 2.11, 95% CI − 3.87, − 0.36, p trend 0.009). There was no association between perceived neighborhood safety from crime and cognition among women, or between any perceived neighborhood environment measure and cognition among men. Conclusions: Middle-aged and older Hispanic/Latina women living in neighborhoods with the lowest perceived problems had higher global cognition and memory. Women living in neighborhoods with the highest perceived social cohesion had lower global cognition, verbal learning, verbal fluency, and processing speed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2020

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Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Hispanics/Latinos
  • Neighborhood problems
  • Safety from crime
  • Social cohesion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Estrella, M. L., Durazo-Arvizu, R. A., Gallo, L. C., Isasi, C. R., Perreira, K. M., Vu, T. H. T., Vasquez, E., Sachdeva, S., Zeng, D., Llabre, M. M., Tarraf, W., González, H. M., Daviglus, M. L., & Lamar, M. (Accepted/In press). Associations between perceived neighborhood environment and cognitive function among middle-aged and older women and men: Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00127-019-01829-0