Are antioxidant levels measured immediately postoperatively an indicator of magnitude of injury?

Don M. Morris, Harriet O. Smith, Wei Liu, Mark C. Genesen, Dorothy H. Vander Jagt, Robert H. Glew, Donald E. Fry

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7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Little is known about the changes that occur in antioxidant levels in response to surgical trauma. The antioxidant system may influence recovery and healing after operation. Miller et al described a reliable assay for total antioxidant capacity of serum. We studied changes in antioxidant levels secondary to operation using this assay. Methods: Twenty-seven patients were studied: 14 abdominal and 13 breast cancer operations. Initial blood samples were obtained when starting the preoperative intravenous line, the second in the recovery room, and every 6 hours thereafter. Results: Levels did not correlate with diagnosis, extent of operation, age, body mass index, or complications. Differences between preoperative and postoperative values in the down and up groups were significant at P = 0.002 and P = 0.023, respectively. Differences in initial levels between the down and up groups were significant at P = 0.005. Levels 12 hours after operation were stable. Conclusions: Rapid return to a baseline of approximately 1 μmole/L, regardless of the direction of initial response, supports the concept of a set point for regulation of serum's antioxidant capacity. (C) 2001 by Excerpta Medica, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)212-216
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume180
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 27 2000

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Morris, D. M., Smith, H. O., Liu, W., Genesen, M. C., Vander Jagt, D. H., Glew, R. H., & Fry, D. E. (2000). Are antioxidant levels measured immediately postoperatively an indicator of magnitude of injury? American Journal of Surgery, 180(3), 212-216. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0002-9610(00)00475-X