Apolipoprotein A-V is present in bile and its secretion increases with lipid absorption in Sprague-Dawley rats

Linda S. Zhang, Hirokazu Sato, Qing Yang, Robert O. Ryan, David Q.H. Wang, Philip N. Howles, Patrick Tso

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Apolipoprotein (apo) A-V is a protein synthesized only in the liver that dramatically modulates plasma triglyceride levels. Recent studies suggest a novel role for hepatic apoA-V in regulating the absorption of dietary triglycerides, but its mode of action on the gut remains unknown. The aim of this study was to test for apoA-V in bile and to determine whether its secretion is regulated by dietary lipids. After an overnight recovery, adult male Sprague-Dawley bile fistula rats indeed secreted apoA-V into bile at a constant rate under fasting conditions. An intraduodenal bolus of intralipid (n = 12) increased the biliary secretion of apoA-V but not of other apolipoproteins, such as A-I, A-IV, B, and E. The lipid-induced increase of biliary apoA-V was abolished under conditions of poor lymphatic lipid transport, suggesting that the stimulation is regulated by the magnitude of lipids associated with chylomicrons transported into lymph. We also studied the secretion of apoA-V into bile immediately following bile duct cannulation. Biliary apoA-V increased over time (~6-fold increase at hour 16, n = 8) but the secretions of other apolipoproteins remained constant. Replenishing luminal phosphatidylcholine and taurocholate (n = 9) only enhanced apoA-V secretion in bile, suggesting that the increase was not due to depletion of phospholipids or bile salts. This is the first study to demonstrate that apoA-V is secreted into bile, introducing a potential route of delivery of hepatic apoA-V to the gut lumen. Our study also reveals the uniqueness of apoA-V secretion into bile that is regulated by mechanisms different from other apolipoproteins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)G918-G925
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
Volume309
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • Bile fistula
  • Bile salts
  • Chylomicron
  • Fat absorption
  • Negative feedback regulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology
  • Physiology (medical)

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