Antibiotic stability in a pediatric parenteral alimentation solution

Amy S. Fox, K. M. Boyer, H. M. Sweeney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The infant who has a central intravenous catheter for parenteral alimentation and is in need of antibiotic treatment confronts the pediatrician with several therapeutic problems. Intermittent disruption of the central catheter infusion to administer therapy may jeopardize the catheter's sterility; treatment in peripheral veins may be technically difficult. If the site of infection is the central line itself, peripheral treatment may be ineffective. Catheter removal, on the other hand, may leave the patient without a route for drug administration. In these circumstances, we have occasionally resorted to treating serious infections with continuous antibiotic infusion in the alimentation solution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)813-817
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume112
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pediatrics
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Catheters
Drug Administration Routes
Therapeutics
Infection
Infertility
Veins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Antibiotic stability in a pediatric parenteral alimentation solution. / Fox, Amy S.; Boyer, K. M.; Sweeney, H. M.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 112, No. 5, 1988, p. 813-817.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fox, AS, Boyer, KM & Sweeney, HM 1988, 'Antibiotic stability in a pediatric parenteral alimentation solution', Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 112, no. 5, pp. 813-817.
Fox, Amy S. ; Boyer, K. M. ; Sweeney, H. M. / Antibiotic stability in a pediatric parenteral alimentation solution. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 1988 ; Vol. 112, No. 5. pp. 813-817.
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