An innovative program to provide adequate women's health education to residents with VA-based ambulatory care experiences

Rosemarie L. Conigliaro, Rachel Hess, Melissa McNeil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires internal medicine residents to spend 25% continuity clinic time seeing patients of each gender. This requirement is a challenge for programs that use a Veterans Administration Hospital (VA) as the sole site for residents' continuity clinic, because of its predominately a male patient population. Purpose: To ensure VA- clinic-based residents meet the ACGME requirement regarding gender care and receive adequate training in women's-health issues and to assess and evaluate a novel program designed to fulfill these needs.. Methods: We developed a program that allows VA-based residents to spend 75% continuity practice time in VA clinic and 25% in a university-based clinic. We surveyed program participants annually regarding their experiences and in post graduate years (PGY) 1 and 3 assessed all residents' knowledge of women's health (WH). Results: Thirty-five residents were paired with faculty preceptors over 3 years. In annual program surveys, program residents reported seeing a gender mix of patients and feeling more comfortable with women's health. In knowledge surveys, mean score of all residents improved from 46% to 54% (p = .002). Factors associated with improvement were female resident gender (p = .004), having VA continuity clinic (p = .001), having specialized women's health preceptors (p = .006), and seeing at least 30% female patients (p = .01). In the multivariable model, resident gender and having a VA continuity clinic remained significant. Conclusions: Our program provides a novel, effective method to ensure VA-based internal medicine residents receive adequate educational experiences in gender-specific care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)148-153
Number of pages6
JournalTeaching and Learning in Medicine
Volume19
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 2007
Externally publishedYes

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hospital administration
Veterans Hospitals
United States Department of Veterans Affairs
Women's Health
Ambulatory Care
Health Education
health promotion
resident
experience
Graduate Medical Education
continuity
Accreditation
gender
Internal Medicine
graduate
health
accreditation
medicine
Emotions
education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Education

Cite this

An innovative program to provide adequate women's health education to residents with VA-based ambulatory care experiences. / Conigliaro, Rosemarie L.; Hess, Rachel; McNeil, Melissa.

In: Teaching and Learning in Medicine, Vol. 19, No. 2, 03.2007, p. 148-153.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Conigliaro, Rosemarie L. ; Hess, Rachel ; McNeil, Melissa. / An innovative program to provide adequate women's health education to residents with VA-based ambulatory care experiences. In: Teaching and Learning in Medicine. 2007 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 148-153.
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