Alerting, orienting, and executive attention in older adults

Jeannette R. Mahoney, Joe Verghese, Yelena Goldin, Richard B. Lipton, Roee Holtzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Attention Network Test (ANT) assesses alerting, orienting, and executive attention. The current study was designed to achieve three main objectives. First, we determined the reliability, effects, and interactions of attention networks in a relatively large cohort of non-demented older adults (n = 184). Second, in the context of this aged cohort, we examined the effect of chronological age on attention networks. Third, the effect of blood pressure on ANT performance was evaluated. Results revealed high-reliability for the ANT as a whole, and for specific cue and flanker types. We found significant main effects for the three attention networks as well as diminished alerting but enhanced orienting effects during conflict resolution trials. Furthermore, increased chronological age and low blood pressure were both associated with significantly worse performance on the executive attention network. These findings are consistent with executive function decline in older adults and the plausible effect of reduced blood flow to the frontal lobes on individual differences in attention demanding tasks. (JINS, 2010, 16, 877-889.)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)877-889
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

Fingerprint

Cohort Effect
Executive Function
Negotiating
Frontal Lobe
Individuality
Hypotension
Cues
Blood Pressure

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Attention
  • Blood pressure
  • Executive function
  • Processing speed

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Alerting, orienting, and executive attention in older adults. / Mahoney, Jeannette R.; Verghese, Joe; Goldin, Yelena; Lipton, Richard B.; Holtzer, Roee.

In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Vol. 16, No. 5, 09.2010, p. 877-889.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5f0e90488ffa4ee98a82452ab256db73,
title = "Alerting, orienting, and executive attention in older adults",
abstract = "The Attention Network Test (ANT) assesses alerting, orienting, and executive attention. The current study was designed to achieve three main objectives. First, we determined the reliability, effects, and interactions of attention networks in a relatively large cohort of non-demented older adults (n = 184). Second, in the context of this aged cohort, we examined the effect of chronological age on attention networks. Third, the effect of blood pressure on ANT performance was evaluated. Results revealed high-reliability for the ANT as a whole, and for specific cue and flanker types. We found significant main effects for the three attention networks as well as diminished alerting but enhanced orienting effects during conflict resolution trials. Furthermore, increased chronological age and low blood pressure were both associated with significantly worse performance on the executive attention network. These findings are consistent with executive function decline in older adults and the plausible effect of reduced blood flow to the frontal lobes on individual differences in attention demanding tasks. (JINS, 2010, 16, 877-889.)",
keywords = "Aging, Attention, Blood pressure, Executive function, Processing speed",
author = "Mahoney, {Jeannette R.} and Joe Verghese and Yelena Goldin and Lipton, {Richard B.} and Roee Holtzer",
year = "2010",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1017/S1355617710000767",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "877--889",
journal = "Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society",
issn = "1355-6177",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Alerting, orienting, and executive attention in older adults

AU - Mahoney, Jeannette R.

AU - Verghese, Joe

AU - Goldin, Yelena

AU - Lipton, Richard B.

AU - Holtzer, Roee

PY - 2010/9

Y1 - 2010/9

N2 - The Attention Network Test (ANT) assesses alerting, orienting, and executive attention. The current study was designed to achieve three main objectives. First, we determined the reliability, effects, and interactions of attention networks in a relatively large cohort of non-demented older adults (n = 184). Second, in the context of this aged cohort, we examined the effect of chronological age on attention networks. Third, the effect of blood pressure on ANT performance was evaluated. Results revealed high-reliability for the ANT as a whole, and for specific cue and flanker types. We found significant main effects for the three attention networks as well as diminished alerting but enhanced orienting effects during conflict resolution trials. Furthermore, increased chronological age and low blood pressure were both associated with significantly worse performance on the executive attention network. These findings are consistent with executive function decline in older adults and the plausible effect of reduced blood flow to the frontal lobes on individual differences in attention demanding tasks. (JINS, 2010, 16, 877-889.)

AB - The Attention Network Test (ANT) assesses alerting, orienting, and executive attention. The current study was designed to achieve three main objectives. First, we determined the reliability, effects, and interactions of attention networks in a relatively large cohort of non-demented older adults (n = 184). Second, in the context of this aged cohort, we examined the effect of chronological age on attention networks. Third, the effect of blood pressure on ANT performance was evaluated. Results revealed high-reliability for the ANT as a whole, and for specific cue and flanker types. We found significant main effects for the three attention networks as well as diminished alerting but enhanced orienting effects during conflict resolution trials. Furthermore, increased chronological age and low blood pressure were both associated with significantly worse performance on the executive attention network. These findings are consistent with executive function decline in older adults and the plausible effect of reduced blood flow to the frontal lobes on individual differences in attention demanding tasks. (JINS, 2010, 16, 877-889.)

KW - Aging

KW - Attention

KW - Blood pressure

KW - Executive function

KW - Processing speed

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79451471394&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79451471394&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S1355617710000767

DO - 10.1017/S1355617710000767

M3 - Article

C2 - 20663241

AN - SCOPUS:79451471394

VL - 16

SP - 877

EP - 889

JO - Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society

JF - Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society

SN - 1355-6177

IS - 5

ER -