Aging-dependent reduction in glyoxalase 1 delays wound healing

Thomas H. Fleming, Till Martin Theilen, Jinit Masania, Marius Wunderle, Jamshid Karimi, Spiros Vittas, Rainer Bernauer, Angelika Bierhaus, Naila Rabbani, Paul J. Thornalley, Jens Kroll, Jens Tyedmers, Ralph Nawrotzki, Stephan Herzig, Michael Brownlee, Peter P. Nawroth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Methylglyoxal (MG), the major dicarbonyl substrate of the enzyme glyoxalase 1 (GLO1), is a reactive metabolite formed via glycolytic flux. Decreased GLO1 activity in situ has been shown to result in an accumulation of MG and increased formation of advanced glycation endproducts, both of which can accumulate during physiological aging and at an accelerated rate in diabetes and other chronic degenerative diseases. To determine the physiological consequences which result from elevated MG levels and the role of MG and GLO1 in aging, wound healing in young (≤12 weeks) and old (≥52 weeks) wild-type mice was studied. Old mice were found to have a significantly slower rate of wound healing compared to young mice (74.9 ± 2.2 vs. 55.4 ± 1.5% wound closure at day 6; 26% decrease; p < 0.0001). This was associated with decreases in GLO1 transcription, expression and activity. The importance of GLO1 was confirmed in mice by inhibition of GLO1. Direct application of MG to the wounds of young mice, decreased wound healing by 24% compared to untreated mice, whereas application of BSA modified minimally by MG had no effect. Treatment of either young or old mice with aminoguanidine, a scavenger of free MG, significantly increased wound closure by 16% (66.8 ± 1.6 vs. 77.2 ± 3.1%; p < 0.05) and 64% (40.4 ± 7.9 vs. 66.4 ± 5.2%; p < 0.05), respectively, by day 6. As a result of the aminoguanidine treatment, the overall rate of wound healing in the old mice was restored to the level observed in the young mice. These findings were confirmed in vitro, as MG reduced migration and proliferation of fibroblasts derived from young and old, wild-type mice. The data demonstrate that the balance between MG and age-dependent GLO1 downregulation contributes to delayed wound healing in old mice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)427-437
Number of pages11
JournalGerontology
Volume59
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

Fingerprint

Pyruvaldehyde
Wound Healing
Wounds and Injuries
Chronic Disease
Down-Regulation
Fibroblasts

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Glyoxalase 1
  • Methylglyoxal
  • Wound healing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Fleming, T. H., Theilen, T. M., Masania, J., Wunderle, M., Karimi, J., Vittas, S., ... Nawroth, P. P. (2013). Aging-dependent reduction in glyoxalase 1 delays wound healing. Gerontology, 59(5), 427-437. https://doi.org/10.1159/000351628

Aging-dependent reduction in glyoxalase 1 delays wound healing. / Fleming, Thomas H.; Theilen, Till Martin; Masania, Jinit; Wunderle, Marius; Karimi, Jamshid; Vittas, Spiros; Bernauer, Rainer; Bierhaus, Angelika; Rabbani, Naila; Thornalley, Paul J.; Kroll, Jens; Tyedmers, Jens; Nawrotzki, Ralph; Herzig, Stephan; Brownlee, Michael; Nawroth, Peter P.

In: Gerontology, Vol. 59, No. 5, 08.2013, p. 427-437.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fleming, TH, Theilen, TM, Masania, J, Wunderle, M, Karimi, J, Vittas, S, Bernauer, R, Bierhaus, A, Rabbani, N, Thornalley, PJ, Kroll, J, Tyedmers, J, Nawrotzki, R, Herzig, S, Brownlee, M & Nawroth, PP 2013, 'Aging-dependent reduction in glyoxalase 1 delays wound healing', Gerontology, vol. 59, no. 5, pp. 427-437. https://doi.org/10.1159/000351628
Fleming TH, Theilen TM, Masania J, Wunderle M, Karimi J, Vittas S et al. Aging-dependent reduction in glyoxalase 1 delays wound healing. Gerontology. 2013 Aug;59(5):427-437. https://doi.org/10.1159/000351628
Fleming, Thomas H. ; Theilen, Till Martin ; Masania, Jinit ; Wunderle, Marius ; Karimi, Jamshid ; Vittas, Spiros ; Bernauer, Rainer ; Bierhaus, Angelika ; Rabbani, Naila ; Thornalley, Paul J. ; Kroll, Jens ; Tyedmers, Jens ; Nawrotzki, Ralph ; Herzig, Stephan ; Brownlee, Michael ; Nawroth, Peter P. / Aging-dependent reduction in glyoxalase 1 delays wound healing. In: Gerontology. 2013 ; Vol. 59, No. 5. pp. 427-437.
@article{d3e529461933422090a0a2586fe40a70,
title = "Aging-dependent reduction in glyoxalase 1 delays wound healing",
abstract = "Methylglyoxal (MG), the major dicarbonyl substrate of the enzyme glyoxalase 1 (GLO1), is a reactive metabolite formed via glycolytic flux. Decreased GLO1 activity in situ has been shown to result in an accumulation of MG and increased formation of advanced glycation endproducts, both of which can accumulate during physiological aging and at an accelerated rate in diabetes and other chronic degenerative diseases. To determine the physiological consequences which result from elevated MG levels and the role of MG and GLO1 in aging, wound healing in young (≤12 weeks) and old (≥52 weeks) wild-type mice was studied. Old mice were found to have a significantly slower rate of wound healing compared to young mice (74.9 ± 2.2 vs. 55.4 ± 1.5{\%} wound closure at day 6; 26{\%} decrease; p < 0.0001). This was associated with decreases in GLO1 transcription, expression and activity. The importance of GLO1 was confirmed in mice by inhibition of GLO1. Direct application of MG to the wounds of young mice, decreased wound healing by 24{\%} compared to untreated mice, whereas application of BSA modified minimally by MG had no effect. Treatment of either young or old mice with aminoguanidine, a scavenger of free MG, significantly increased wound closure by 16{\%} (66.8 ± 1.6 vs. 77.2 ± 3.1{\%}; p < 0.05) and 64{\%} (40.4 ± 7.9 vs. 66.4 ± 5.2{\%}; p < 0.05), respectively, by day 6. As a result of the aminoguanidine treatment, the overall rate of wound healing in the old mice was restored to the level observed in the young mice. These findings were confirmed in vitro, as MG reduced migration and proliferation of fibroblasts derived from young and old, wild-type mice. The data demonstrate that the balance between MG and age-dependent GLO1 downregulation contributes to delayed wound healing in old mice.",
keywords = "Aging, Glyoxalase 1, Methylglyoxal, Wound healing",
author = "Fleming, {Thomas H.} and Theilen, {Till Martin} and Jinit Masania and Marius Wunderle and Jamshid Karimi and Spiros Vittas and Rainer Bernauer and Angelika Bierhaus and Naila Rabbani and Thornalley, {Paul J.} and Jens Kroll and Jens Tyedmers and Ralph Nawrotzki and Stephan Herzig and Michael Brownlee and Nawroth, {Peter P.}",
year = "2013",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1159/000351628",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "59",
pages = "427--437",
journal = "Gerontology",
issn = "0304-324X",
publisher = "S. Karger AG",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Aging-dependent reduction in glyoxalase 1 delays wound healing

AU - Fleming, Thomas H.

AU - Theilen, Till Martin

AU - Masania, Jinit

AU - Wunderle, Marius

AU - Karimi, Jamshid

AU - Vittas, Spiros

AU - Bernauer, Rainer

AU - Bierhaus, Angelika

AU - Rabbani, Naila

AU - Thornalley, Paul J.

AU - Kroll, Jens

AU - Tyedmers, Jens

AU - Nawrotzki, Ralph

AU - Herzig, Stephan

AU - Brownlee, Michael

AU - Nawroth, Peter P.

PY - 2013/8

Y1 - 2013/8

N2 - Methylglyoxal (MG), the major dicarbonyl substrate of the enzyme glyoxalase 1 (GLO1), is a reactive metabolite formed via glycolytic flux. Decreased GLO1 activity in situ has been shown to result in an accumulation of MG and increased formation of advanced glycation endproducts, both of which can accumulate during physiological aging and at an accelerated rate in diabetes and other chronic degenerative diseases. To determine the physiological consequences which result from elevated MG levels and the role of MG and GLO1 in aging, wound healing in young (≤12 weeks) and old (≥52 weeks) wild-type mice was studied. Old mice were found to have a significantly slower rate of wound healing compared to young mice (74.9 ± 2.2 vs. 55.4 ± 1.5% wound closure at day 6; 26% decrease; p < 0.0001). This was associated with decreases in GLO1 transcription, expression and activity. The importance of GLO1 was confirmed in mice by inhibition of GLO1. Direct application of MG to the wounds of young mice, decreased wound healing by 24% compared to untreated mice, whereas application of BSA modified minimally by MG had no effect. Treatment of either young or old mice with aminoguanidine, a scavenger of free MG, significantly increased wound closure by 16% (66.8 ± 1.6 vs. 77.2 ± 3.1%; p < 0.05) and 64% (40.4 ± 7.9 vs. 66.4 ± 5.2%; p < 0.05), respectively, by day 6. As a result of the aminoguanidine treatment, the overall rate of wound healing in the old mice was restored to the level observed in the young mice. These findings were confirmed in vitro, as MG reduced migration and proliferation of fibroblasts derived from young and old, wild-type mice. The data demonstrate that the balance between MG and age-dependent GLO1 downregulation contributes to delayed wound healing in old mice.

AB - Methylglyoxal (MG), the major dicarbonyl substrate of the enzyme glyoxalase 1 (GLO1), is a reactive metabolite formed via glycolytic flux. Decreased GLO1 activity in situ has been shown to result in an accumulation of MG and increased formation of advanced glycation endproducts, both of which can accumulate during physiological aging and at an accelerated rate in diabetes and other chronic degenerative diseases. To determine the physiological consequences which result from elevated MG levels and the role of MG and GLO1 in aging, wound healing in young (≤12 weeks) and old (≥52 weeks) wild-type mice was studied. Old mice were found to have a significantly slower rate of wound healing compared to young mice (74.9 ± 2.2 vs. 55.4 ± 1.5% wound closure at day 6; 26% decrease; p < 0.0001). This was associated with decreases in GLO1 transcription, expression and activity. The importance of GLO1 was confirmed in mice by inhibition of GLO1. Direct application of MG to the wounds of young mice, decreased wound healing by 24% compared to untreated mice, whereas application of BSA modified minimally by MG had no effect. Treatment of either young or old mice with aminoguanidine, a scavenger of free MG, significantly increased wound closure by 16% (66.8 ± 1.6 vs. 77.2 ± 3.1%; p < 0.05) and 64% (40.4 ± 7.9 vs. 66.4 ± 5.2%; p < 0.05), respectively, by day 6. As a result of the aminoguanidine treatment, the overall rate of wound healing in the old mice was restored to the level observed in the young mice. These findings were confirmed in vitro, as MG reduced migration and proliferation of fibroblasts derived from young and old, wild-type mice. The data demonstrate that the balance between MG and age-dependent GLO1 downregulation contributes to delayed wound healing in old mice.

KW - Aging

KW - Glyoxalase 1

KW - Methylglyoxal

KW - Wound healing

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84883420686&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84883420686&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1159/000351628

DO - 10.1159/000351628

M3 - Article

VL - 59

SP - 427

EP - 437

JO - Gerontology

JF - Gerontology

SN - 0304-324X

IS - 5

ER -