Advances in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated kidney diseases

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite improved outcomes among persons living with HIV who are treated with antiretroviral therapy, they remain at increased risk for acute and chronic kidney diseases. Moreover, since HIV can infect renal epithelial cells, the kidney might serve as a viral reservoir that would need to be eradicated when attempting to achieve full virologic cure. In recent years, much progress has been made in elucidating the mechanism by which HIV infects renal epithelial cells and the viral and host factors that promote development of kidney disease. Polymorphisms in APOL1 confer markedly increased risk of HIV-associated nephropathy; however, the mechanism by which ApoL1 variants may promote kidney disease remains unclear. HIV-positive persons are at increased risk of acute kidney injury, which may be a result of a high burden of subclinical kidney disease and/or viral factors and frequent exposure to nephrotoxins. Despite the beneficial effect of antiretroviral therapy in preventing and treating HIVAN, and possibly other forms of kidney disease in persons living with HIV, some of these medications, including tenofovir, indinavir, and atazanavir can induce acute and/or chronic kidney injury via mitochondrial toxicity or intratubular crystallization. Further research is needed to better understand factors that contribute to acute and chronic kidney injury in HIV-positive patients and to develop more effective strategies to prevent and treat kidney disease in this vulnerable population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)266-274
Number of pages9
JournalKidney International
Volume86
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Kidney Diseases
HIV
Kidney
Tenofovir
Acute Kidney Injury
AIDS-Associated Nephropathy
Epithelial Cells
Indinavir
Vulnerable Populations
Crystallization
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics
Research

Keywords

  • focal segmental glomerulosclerosis nephrotoxicity
  • podocyte
  • proximal tubule

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Advances in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated kidney diseases. / Ross, Michael J.

In: Kidney International, Vol. 86, No. 2, 2014, p. 266-274.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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