Acute migraine medication adherence, migraine disability and patient satisfaction

A naturalistic daily diary study

Elizabeth K. Seng, Matthew S. Robbins, Robert A. Nicholson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To examine the influence of acute migraine medication adherence on migraine disability and acute medication satisfaction. Methods Adults with migraine completed three months of daily electronic diaries assessing headache symptoms, acute medication taken, acute medication satisfaction, and daily migraine disability. Repeated measures mixed-effects models examined the effect of initial medication type [migraine-specific medication (MSM) vs. over-the-counter analgesic (OTC) vs. an opiate/barbiturate], the severity of pain at dosing, and their interaction with daily migraine disability and satisfaction with acute medication. Results Participants (N = 337; 92.5% female; 91.1% Caucasian, non-Hispanic; 84.0% with episodic migraine) recorded 29,722 diary days. Participants took acute medication on 96.5% of 8090 migraine days. MSM was most frequently taken first (58%), followed by OTC (29.9%) and an opiate/barbiturate (12.1%). Acute medication was most frequently taken when pain was mild (41.2%), followed by moderate (37.7%) and severe pain (11.4%). Initially dosing with MSM while pain was mild was associated with the lowest daily disability [medication × pain at dosing F (4, 6336.12) = 58.73, p <.001] and highest acute medication satisfaction [medication × pain at dosing F (4, 3867.36) = 24.00, p <.001]. Conclusion Using an MSM (triptan or ergot) first was associated with the lowest migraine disability and highest acute medication satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)955-964
Number of pages10
JournalCephalalgia
Volume37
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

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Medication Adherence
Migraine Disorders
Patient Satisfaction
Pain
Opiate Alkaloids
Analgesics
Tryptamines
Headache

Keywords

  • acute drug therapy
  • adherence
  • disability
  • Migraine
  • patient satisfaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Acute migraine medication adherence, migraine disability and patient satisfaction : A naturalistic daily diary study. / Seng, Elizabeth K.; Robbins, Matthew S.; Nicholson, Robert A.

In: Cephalalgia, Vol. 37, No. 10, 01.09.2017, p. 955-964.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Objective To examine the influence of acute migraine medication adherence on migraine disability and acute medication satisfaction. Methods Adults with migraine completed three months of daily electronic diaries assessing headache symptoms, acute medication taken, acute medication satisfaction, and daily migraine disability. Repeated measures mixed-effects models examined the effect of initial medication type [migraine-specific medication (MSM) vs. over-the-counter analgesic (OTC) vs. an opiate/barbiturate], the severity of pain at dosing, and their interaction with daily migraine disability and satisfaction with acute medication. Results Participants (N = 337; 92.5% female; 91.1% Caucasian, non-Hispanic; 84.0% with episodic migraine) recorded 29,722 diary days. Participants took acute medication on 96.5% of 8090 migraine days. MSM was most frequently taken first (58%), followed by OTC (29.9%) and an opiate/barbiturate (12.1%). Acute medication was most frequently taken when pain was mild (41.2%), followed by moderate (37.7%) and severe pain (11.4%). Initially dosing with MSM while pain was mild was associated with the lowest daily disability [medication × pain at dosing F (4, 6336.12) = 58.73, p <.001] and highest acute medication satisfaction [medication × pain at dosing F (4, 3867.36) = 24.00, p <.001]. Conclusion Using an MSM (triptan or ergot) first was associated with the lowest migraine disability and highest acute medication satisfaction.

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