Abnormalities of immunoregulatory T cells in disorders of immune function

E. L. Reinherz, Arye Rubinstein, R. S. Geha, A. J. Strelkauskas, F. S. Rosen, S. F. Schlossman

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Abstract

We studied a five-year-old girl with several autoimmune disorders and a 16-year-old boy with acquired agammaglobulinemia to determine whether aberrations of immunoregulatory T cells could explain some instances of immunodeficiency or autoimmunity. The normal peripheral blood T-cell population, as defined by specific heteroantiserums, is 20 per cent TH 2 + and 80 per cent TH 2 -. Human suppressor cells are TH 2 +, whereas helper cells are TH 2 -. In addition, each subset expresses Ia antigens upon activation. Our patient with autoimmune disease had no demonstrable TH 2+ cells, and her lymphocytes could not be induced to suppress. Her circulating T cells were of an activated-helper phenotype, i.e., TH 2 +,Ia +. In contrast, in the boy with agammaglobuline, the T-cell population was predominantly of an activated-suppressor phenotype, i.e., TH 2 +,Ia +. This patient's T cells abrogated both his own and his histoidentical brother's B-cell secretion of immunoglobulins. We conclude that the characterization of T cells may provide insight into the causes of a number of abnormal immune states in man.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1018-1022
Number of pages5
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume301
Issue number19
StatePublished - 1979

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Immune System Diseases
T-Lymphocytes
Th2 Cells
Phenotype
Agammaglobulinemia
Histocompatibility Antigens Class II
Helper-Inducer T-Lymphocytes
Autoimmunity
Population
Autoimmune Diseases
Immunoglobulins
Siblings
Blood Cells
B-Lymphocytes
Lymphocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Reinherz, E. L., Rubinstein, A., Geha, R. S., Strelkauskas, A. J., Rosen, F. S., & Schlossman, S. F. (1979). Abnormalities of immunoregulatory T cells in disorders of immune function. New England Journal of Medicine, 301(19), 1018-1022.

Abnormalities of immunoregulatory T cells in disorders of immune function. / Reinherz, E. L.; Rubinstein, Arye; Geha, R. S.; Strelkauskas, A. J.; Rosen, F. S.; Schlossman, S. F.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 301, No. 19, 1979, p. 1018-1022.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reinherz, EL, Rubinstein, A, Geha, RS, Strelkauskas, AJ, Rosen, FS & Schlossman, SF 1979, 'Abnormalities of immunoregulatory T cells in disorders of immune function', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 301, no. 19, pp. 1018-1022.
Reinherz EL, Rubinstein A, Geha RS, Strelkauskas AJ, Rosen FS, Schlossman SF. Abnormalities of immunoregulatory T cells in disorders of immune function. New England Journal of Medicine. 1979;301(19):1018-1022.
Reinherz, E. L. ; Rubinstein, Arye ; Geha, R. S. ; Strelkauskas, A. J. ; Rosen, F. S. ; Schlossman, S. F. / Abnormalities of immunoregulatory T cells in disorders of immune function. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1979 ; Vol. 301, No. 19. pp. 1018-1022.
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