A survey of spinal and epidural techniques in adult cardiac surgery

Sheldon Goldstein, David Dean, Se Jun Kim, Kim Cocozello, Julie Grofsik, Paula Silver, Ronald P. Cody

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine if a significant number of anesthesiologists are performing spinal and epidural techniques in adults undergoing cardiac surgery and if any neurologic injuries have been associated with these techniques. Design: Anonymous survey of clinical practice. Setting: Data collected via mail from members of the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists. Participants: Attending anesthesiologists. Interventions: Anesthesiologists completed an anonymous survey of their use of spinal and epidural techniques in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Measurements and Main Results: Of 3974 anesthesiologists, 974 (24%) responded to the questionnaire; 892 are at institutions that perform cardiac surgery. Of the 892 responders, 68 (7.6%) reported they use spinal techniques, whereas 62 (7%) reported they use epidural techniques. Nine (1%) anesthesiologists reported they use both techniques. There were no reports of neurologic complications related to the use of spinal or epidural techniques performed by the anesthesiologists responding to the survey. Conclusions: A significant number of anesthesiologists are performing spinal and epidural techniques in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Prospective, controlled trials should be performed to evaluate the benefits and risks of spinal and epidural techniques in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)158-168
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Thoracic Surgery
Nervous System Trauma
Postal Service
Anesthesiologists
Surveys and Questionnaires
Nervous System
Population

Keywords

  • Anticoagulation
  • Cardiac surgery
  • Epidural
  • Hematoma
  • Spinal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

A survey of spinal and epidural techniques in adult cardiac surgery. / Goldstein, Sheldon; Dean, David; Kim, Se Jun; Cocozello, Kim; Grofsik, Julie; Silver, Paula; Cody, Ronald P.

In: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia, Vol. 15, No. 2, 2001, p. 158-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goldstein, Sheldon ; Dean, David ; Kim, Se Jun ; Cocozello, Kim ; Grofsik, Julie ; Silver, Paula ; Cody, Ronald P. / A survey of spinal and epidural techniques in adult cardiac surgery. In: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia. 2001 ; Vol. 15, No. 2. pp. 158-168.
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