A survey of airway training among U.S. and Canadian anesthesiology residency programs

Leonard M. Pott, Gail I. Randel, Tracey Straker, Katherine D. Becker, Richard M. Cooper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objective: To determine the current trends in airway education in academic programs. Design: Survey instrument. Setting: American academic medical center. Subjects: 147 directors of American and Canadian anesthesiology residency programs. Measurements: An invitation to complete an online questionnaire was sent. Non-responding institutions were contacted repeatedly by email and telephone to ensure a reasonable response rate. Main Results: 88 of the 147 (60%) programs completed the survey. Forty-three respondents (49%) reported that they had formal airway rotations, and 39 respondents said that a designated titled faculty member was responsible for airway training. Didactic lecture and manikin instruction were used by more than two thirds of the programs. Documentation of supervised airway experience was recorded in 71 (82%) programs. The majority of the programs (81%) had videolaryngoscopes. A fiberoptic bronchoscope was nearly universally available, and approximately one third (34%) of graduating residents were estimated to have performed more than 25 awake fiberoptic intubations. For most techniques, the estimates of the required number of procedures to ensure competence varied widely. Conclusions: The number of programs with a formal airway management program continues to increase, and programs are incorporating newer intubation techniques. The criteria for competence have not been established.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-26
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Clinical Anesthesia
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2011

Fingerprint

Anesthesiology
Internship and Residency
Intubation
Mental Competency
Manikins
Bronchoscopes
Airway Management
Telephone
Documentation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Education

Keywords

  • Airway training
  • Anesthesiologists
  • Anesthesiology residency programs
  • Intubation, intratracheal:instruction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

A survey of airway training among U.S. and Canadian anesthesiology residency programs. / Pott, Leonard M.; Randel, Gail I.; Straker, Tracey; Becker, Katherine D.; Cooper, Richard M.

In: Journal of Clinical Anesthesia, Vol. 23, No. 1, 02.2011, p. 15-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pott, Leonard M. ; Randel, Gail I. ; Straker, Tracey ; Becker, Katherine D. ; Cooper, Richard M. / A survey of airway training among U.S. and Canadian anesthesiology residency programs. In: Journal of Clinical Anesthesia. 2011 ; Vol. 23, No. 1. pp. 15-26.
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