A population-based case-control study of diet and breast cancer in Australia

Thomas E. Rohan, A. J. Mcmichael, P. A. Baghurst

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

127 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relation between diet and breast cancer was examined in a population-based case-control study conducted in Adelaide, South Australia, involving 451 case-control pairs aged 20-74 years. Cases were identified through the state cancer registry between April 1982 and July 1984; for each case, one age-matched control was selected from the electoral register. Dietary intake was measured by self-administered quantitative food frequency questionnaires. There was little variation in risk across levels of daily intake of energy, protein, and total fat; for energy, the relative risk of breast cancer at the uppermost fifth of intake, relative to a risk of unity for the lowest fifth, was 1.22 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.80-1.86); for protein, the corresponding relative risk was 1.09(95% CI 0.72-1.64), and for total fat, the relative risk was 0.90 (95% CI 0.59-1.38). Variation in risk in association with sugar and starch intake was also insubstantial, while for fiber, there was a nonuniform reduction in risk at the three uppermost fifths of intake. Risk varied little with level of retinol intake, but it decreased with increasing intake of beta-carotene, a trend that was statistically significant; the relative risk of breast cancer at the uppermost fifth of beta-carotene intake was 0.76 (95% CI 0.50-1.18). Multivariate adjustment for the effects of potentially confounding variables did not alter these patterns. The study does not support a role for dietary fat in the etiology of breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)478-489
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume128
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Case-Control Studies
Breast Neoplasms
Diet
Population
Confidence Intervals
beta Carotene
Fats
South Australia
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Dietary Fats
Risk Reduction Behavior
Energy Intake
Vitamin A
Starch
Registries
Proteins
Food
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Breast neoplasms
  • Diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

A population-based case-control study of diet and breast cancer in Australia. / Rohan, Thomas E.; Mcmichael, A. J.; Baghurst, P. A.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 128, No. 3, 09.1988, p. 478-489.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rohan, Thomas E. ; Mcmichael, A. J. ; Baghurst, P. A. / A population-based case-control study of diet and breast cancer in Australia. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 1988 ; Vol. 128, No. 3. pp. 478-489.
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