A National Strategy to Develop Pragmatic Clinical Trials Infrastructure

Thomas W. Concannon, Jeanne Marie Guise, Rowena J. Dolor, Paul Meissner, Sean Tunis, Jerry A. Krishnan, Wilson D. Pace, Joel Saltz, William R. Hersh, Lloyd Michener, Timothy S. Carey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An important challenge in comparative effectiveness research is the lack of infrastructure to support pragmatic clinical trials, which compare interventions in usual practice settings and subjects. These trials present challenges that differ from those of classical efficacy trials, which are conducted under ideal circumstances, in patients selected for their suitability, and with highly controlled protocols. In 2012, we launched a 1-year learning network to identify high-priority pragmatic clinical trials and to deploy research infrastructure through the NIH Clinical and Translational Science Awards Consortium that could be used to launch and sustain them. The network and infrastructure were initiated as a learning ground and shared resource for investigators and communities interested in developing pragmatic clinical trials. We followed a three-stage process of developing the network, prioritizing proposed trials, and implementing learning exercises that culminated in a 1-day network meeting at the end of the year. The year-long project resulted in five recommendations related to developing the network, enhancing community engagement, addressing regulatory challenges, advancing information technology, and developing research methods. The recommendations can be implemented within 24 months and are designed to lead toward a sustained national infrastructure for pragmatic trials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)164-171
Number of pages8
JournalClinical and Translational Science
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Pragmatic Clinical Trials
Learning
Comparative Effectiveness Research
Information technology
Research
Research Personnel
Exercise
Technology

Keywords

  • Ethics
  • Methodology
  • Translational research
  • Trials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Concannon, T. W., Guise, J. M., Dolor, R. J., Meissner, P., Tunis, S., Krishnan, J. A., ... Carey, T. S. (2014). A National Strategy to Develop Pragmatic Clinical Trials Infrastructure. Clinical and Translational Science, 7(2), 164-171. https://doi.org/10.1111/cts.12143

A National Strategy to Develop Pragmatic Clinical Trials Infrastructure. / Concannon, Thomas W.; Guise, Jeanne Marie; Dolor, Rowena J.; Meissner, Paul; Tunis, Sean; Krishnan, Jerry A.; Pace, Wilson D.; Saltz, Joel; Hersh, William R.; Michener, Lloyd; Carey, Timothy S.

In: Clinical and Translational Science, Vol. 7, No. 2, 2014, p. 164-171.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Concannon, TW, Guise, JM, Dolor, RJ, Meissner, P, Tunis, S, Krishnan, JA, Pace, WD, Saltz, J, Hersh, WR, Michener, L & Carey, TS 2014, 'A National Strategy to Develop Pragmatic Clinical Trials Infrastructure', Clinical and Translational Science, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 164-171. https://doi.org/10.1111/cts.12143
Concannon, Thomas W. ; Guise, Jeanne Marie ; Dolor, Rowena J. ; Meissner, Paul ; Tunis, Sean ; Krishnan, Jerry A. ; Pace, Wilson D. ; Saltz, Joel ; Hersh, William R. ; Michener, Lloyd ; Carey, Timothy S. / A National Strategy to Develop Pragmatic Clinical Trials Infrastructure. In: Clinical and Translational Science. 2014 ; Vol. 7, No. 2. pp. 164-171.
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