A mobile medical care approach targeting underserved populations in post-Hurricane Katrina Mississippi

David M. Krol, Michael Redlener, Alan Shapiro, Ania Wajnberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast Mississippi region, damaging health care infrastructure and adversely affecting the health of populations left behind. Operation Assist, a project of the Children's Health Fund and the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, operated mobile medical units to provide health services to underserved populations in the affected areas. Data collected from all patient encounters from September 5-20, 2005 demonstrate that in addition to common respiratory illnesses, skin conditions, and minor injuries, a high proportion of visits were for vaccine administration and chronic medical problems including hypertension, diabetes, and asthma. Mobile medical units staffed by primary care clinicians experienced in dealing with the clinical and social needs of the underserved and comfortable working in a resource-poor environment can make a positive contribution to post-disaster care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)331-340
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of health care for the poor and underserved
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Disaster medicine
  • Hurricane relief
  • Mobile medical services
  • Underserved communities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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