ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Orbits Vision and Visual Loss

Expert Panel on Neurologic Imaging, Tabassum A. Kennedy, Amanda S. Corey, Bruno Policeni, Vikas Agarwal, Judah Burns, H. Benjamin Harvey, Jenny Hoang, Christopher H. Hunt, Amy F. Juliano, William Mack, Gul Moonis, Gregory J.A. Murad, Jeffrey S. Pannell, Matthew S. Parsons, William J. Powers, Jason W. Schroeder, Gavin Setzen, Matthew T. Whitehead, Julie Bykowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Visual loss can be the result of an abnormality anywhere along the visual pathway including the globe, optic nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, thalamus, optic radiations or primary visual cortex. Appropriate imaging analysis of visual loss is facilitated by a compartmental approach that establishes a differential diagnosis on the basis of suspected lesion location and specific clinical features. CT and MRI are the primary imaging modalities used to evaluate patients with visual loss and are often complementary in evaluating these patients. One modality may be preferred over the other depending on the specific clinical scenario. Depending on the pattern of visual loss and differential diagnosis, imaging coverage may require targeted evaluation of the orbits and/or assessment of the brain. Contrast is preferred when masses and inflammatory processes are differential considerations. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

LanguageEnglish (US)
PagesS116-S131
JournalJournal of the American College of Radiology
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Orbit
Differential Diagnosis
Guidelines
Optic Chiasm
Visual Pathways
Expert Testimony
Visual Cortex
Optic Nerve
Thalamus
Radiology
Radiation
Brain
Therapeutics
Optic Tract

Keywords

  • Appropriate Use Criteria
  • Appropriateness Criteria
  • AUC
  • Diplopia
  • Optic neuritis
  • Orbital cellulitis
  • Orbits
  • Vision
  • Visual loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Orbits Vision and Visual Loss. / Expert Panel on Neurologic Imaging.

In: Journal of the American College of Radiology, Vol. 15, No. 5, 01.05.2018, p. S116-S131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Expert Panel on Neurologic Imaging. / ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Orbits Vision and Visual Loss. In: Journal of the American College of Radiology. 2018 ; Vol. 15, No. 5. pp. S116-S131.
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