Writing Memories with Light-Addressable Reinforcement Circuitry

Adam Claridge-Chang, Robert D. Roorda, Eleftheria Vrontou, Lucas L. Sjulson, Haiyan Li, Jay Hirsh, Gero Miesenböck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

264 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dopaminergic neurons are thought to drive learning by signaling changes in the expectations of salient events, such as rewards or punishments. Olfactory conditioning in Drosophila requires direct dopamine action on intrinsic mushroom body neurons, the likely storage sites of olfactory memories. Neither the cellular sources of the conditioning dopamine nor its precise postsynaptic targets are known. By optically controlling genetically circumscribed subsets of dopaminergic neurons in the behaving fly, we have mapped the origin of aversive reinforcement signals to the PPL1 cluster of 12 dopaminergic cells. PPL1 projections target restricted domains in the vertical lobes and heel of the mushroom body. Artificially evoked activity in a small number of identifiable cells thus suffices for programming behaviorally meaningful memories. The delineation of core reinforcement circuitry is an essential first step in dissecting the neural mechanisms that compute and represent valuations, store associations, and guide actions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)405-415
Number of pages11
JournalCell
Volume139
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 16 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mushroom Bodies
Dopaminergic Neurons
Neurons
Dopamine
Reinforcement
Light
Data storage equipment
Punishment
Heel
Reward
Diptera
Drosophila
Cell Count
Learning
Computer programming
Cells
Conditioning (Psychology)
Reinforcement (Psychology)
Drive

Keywords

  • MOLNEURO
  • SYSNEURO

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Claridge-Chang, A., Roorda, R. D., Vrontou, E., Sjulson, L. L., Li, H., Hirsh, J., & Miesenböck, G. (2009). Writing Memories with Light-Addressable Reinforcement Circuitry. Cell, 139(2), 405-415. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2009.08.034

Writing Memories with Light-Addressable Reinforcement Circuitry. / Claridge-Chang, Adam; Roorda, Robert D.; Vrontou, Eleftheria; Sjulson, Lucas L.; Li, Haiyan; Hirsh, Jay; Miesenböck, Gero.

In: Cell, Vol. 139, No. 2, 16.10.2009, p. 405-415.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Claridge-Chang, A, Roorda, RD, Vrontou, E, Sjulson, LL, Li, H, Hirsh, J & Miesenböck, G 2009, 'Writing Memories with Light-Addressable Reinforcement Circuitry', Cell, vol. 139, no. 2, pp. 405-415. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2009.08.034
Claridge-Chang A, Roorda RD, Vrontou E, Sjulson LL, Li H, Hirsh J et al. Writing Memories with Light-Addressable Reinforcement Circuitry. Cell. 2009 Oct 16;139(2):405-415. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2009.08.034
Claridge-Chang, Adam ; Roorda, Robert D. ; Vrontou, Eleftheria ; Sjulson, Lucas L. ; Li, Haiyan ; Hirsh, Jay ; Miesenböck, Gero. / Writing Memories with Light-Addressable Reinforcement Circuitry. In: Cell. 2009 ; Vol. 139, No. 2. pp. 405-415.
@article{1ec692334ad04c0cb978694a504b7016,
title = "Writing Memories with Light-Addressable Reinforcement Circuitry",
abstract = "Dopaminergic neurons are thought to drive learning by signaling changes in the expectations of salient events, such as rewards or punishments. Olfactory conditioning in Drosophila requires direct dopamine action on intrinsic mushroom body neurons, the likely storage sites of olfactory memories. Neither the cellular sources of the conditioning dopamine nor its precise postsynaptic targets are known. By optically controlling genetically circumscribed subsets of dopaminergic neurons in the behaving fly, we have mapped the origin of aversive reinforcement signals to the PPL1 cluster of 12 dopaminergic cells. PPL1 projections target restricted domains in the vertical lobes and heel of the mushroom body. Artificially evoked activity in a small number of identifiable cells thus suffices for programming behaviorally meaningful memories. The delineation of core reinforcement circuitry is an essential first step in dissecting the neural mechanisms that compute and represent valuations, store associations, and guide actions.",
keywords = "MOLNEURO, SYSNEURO",
author = "Adam Claridge-Chang and Roorda, {Robert D.} and Eleftheria Vrontou and Sjulson, {Lucas L.} and Haiyan Li and Jay Hirsh and Gero Miesenb{\"o}ck",
year = "2009",
month = "10",
day = "16",
doi = "10.1016/j.cell.2009.08.034",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "139",
pages = "405--415",
journal = "Cell",
issn = "0092-8674",
publisher = "Cell Press",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Writing Memories with Light-Addressable Reinforcement Circuitry

AU - Claridge-Chang, Adam

AU - Roorda, Robert D.

AU - Vrontou, Eleftheria

AU - Sjulson, Lucas L.

AU - Li, Haiyan

AU - Hirsh, Jay

AU - Miesenböck, Gero

PY - 2009/10/16

Y1 - 2009/10/16

N2 - Dopaminergic neurons are thought to drive learning by signaling changes in the expectations of salient events, such as rewards or punishments. Olfactory conditioning in Drosophila requires direct dopamine action on intrinsic mushroom body neurons, the likely storage sites of olfactory memories. Neither the cellular sources of the conditioning dopamine nor its precise postsynaptic targets are known. By optically controlling genetically circumscribed subsets of dopaminergic neurons in the behaving fly, we have mapped the origin of aversive reinforcement signals to the PPL1 cluster of 12 dopaminergic cells. PPL1 projections target restricted domains in the vertical lobes and heel of the mushroom body. Artificially evoked activity in a small number of identifiable cells thus suffices for programming behaviorally meaningful memories. The delineation of core reinforcement circuitry is an essential first step in dissecting the neural mechanisms that compute and represent valuations, store associations, and guide actions.

AB - Dopaminergic neurons are thought to drive learning by signaling changes in the expectations of salient events, such as rewards or punishments. Olfactory conditioning in Drosophila requires direct dopamine action on intrinsic mushroom body neurons, the likely storage sites of olfactory memories. Neither the cellular sources of the conditioning dopamine nor its precise postsynaptic targets are known. By optically controlling genetically circumscribed subsets of dopaminergic neurons in the behaving fly, we have mapped the origin of aversive reinforcement signals to the PPL1 cluster of 12 dopaminergic cells. PPL1 projections target restricted domains in the vertical lobes and heel of the mushroom body. Artificially evoked activity in a small number of identifiable cells thus suffices for programming behaviorally meaningful memories. The delineation of core reinforcement circuitry is an essential first step in dissecting the neural mechanisms that compute and represent valuations, store associations, and guide actions.

KW - MOLNEURO

KW - SYSNEURO

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=70349804300&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=70349804300&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.cell.2009.08.034

DO - 10.1016/j.cell.2009.08.034

M3 - Article

C2 - 19837039

AN - SCOPUS:70349804300

VL - 139

SP - 405

EP - 415

JO - Cell

JF - Cell

SN - 0092-8674

IS - 2

ER -