Women's perceptions of breastfeeding barriers in early postpartum period: A qualitative analysis nested in two randomized controlled trials

Alice S. Teich, Josephine Barnett, Karen A. Bonuck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This study examined women's perceptions of early infant feeding experiences and identified early postpartum barriers to successful breastfeeding. Subjects and Methods: We conducted semistructured exit interviews at 6 months postpartum with a subsample of participants (n=67) enrolled in two randomized controlled trials of breastfeeding promotion. Study arms included (1) routine pre- and postnatal visits with an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) (LC group), (2) electronically prompted guidance from prenatal care providers (EP group), (3) EP+LC combined, and (4) standard of care (control group). Interview transcripts were coded using grounded theory and analyzed in MAXqda. Code matrices were used to identify early postpartum breastfeeding barriers and were further examined in relation to treatment group using a mixed methods analysis. Results: The majority of the participants reported experiencing at least one barrier to breastfeeding. Barriers to breastfeeding were more commonly reported in the early postpartum than late postpartum period. The most common barrier during the early postpartum period was the perception of inadequate milk supply ("lactational") (n=18), followed by problems with latch, medical problems that were perceived as precluding breastfeeding, and medical staff and hospital practices. Participants frequently reported that the IBCLCs assisted them in anticipating, managing, and overcoming these barriers. Conclusions: Our findings underscore the importance of integrating IBCLCs into routine pre- and postpartum care because they provide critical support that effectively addresses early postpartum barriers to breastfeeding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-15
Number of pages7
JournalBreastfeeding Medicine
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Breast Feeding
Postpartum Period
Randomized Controlled Trials
Hospital Medical Staffs
Interviews
Postnatal Care
Prenatal Care
Standard of Care
Consultants
Lactation
Milk
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Maternity and Midwifery
  • Pediatrics
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Women's perceptions of breastfeeding barriers in early postpartum period : A qualitative analysis nested in two randomized controlled trials. / Teich, Alice S.; Barnett, Josephine; Bonuck, Karen A.

In: Breastfeeding Medicine, Vol. 9, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 9-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f65c8da346034f53aa11c57966b724c9,
title = "Women's perceptions of breastfeeding barriers in early postpartum period: A qualitative analysis nested in two randomized controlled trials",
abstract = "Objectives: This study examined women's perceptions of early infant feeding experiences and identified early postpartum barriers to successful breastfeeding. Subjects and Methods: We conducted semistructured exit interviews at 6 months postpartum with a subsample of participants (n=67) enrolled in two randomized controlled trials of breastfeeding promotion. Study arms included (1) routine pre- and postnatal visits with an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) (LC group), (2) electronically prompted guidance from prenatal care providers (EP group), (3) EP+LC combined, and (4) standard of care (control group). Interview transcripts were coded using grounded theory and analyzed in MAXqda. Code matrices were used to identify early postpartum breastfeeding barriers and were further examined in relation to treatment group using a mixed methods analysis. Results: The majority of the participants reported experiencing at least one barrier to breastfeeding. Barriers to breastfeeding were more commonly reported in the early postpartum than late postpartum period. The most common barrier during the early postpartum period was the perception of inadequate milk supply ({"}lactational{"}) (n=18), followed by problems with latch, medical problems that were perceived as precluding breastfeeding, and medical staff and hospital practices. Participants frequently reported that the IBCLCs assisted them in anticipating, managing, and overcoming these barriers. Conclusions: Our findings underscore the importance of integrating IBCLCs into routine pre- and postpartum care because they provide critical support that effectively addresses early postpartum barriers to breastfeeding.",
author = "Teich, {Alice S.} and Josephine Barnett and Bonuck, {Karen A.}",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/bfm.2013.0063",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
pages = "9--15",
journal = "Breastfeeding Medicine",
issn = "1556-8253",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Women's perceptions of breastfeeding barriers in early postpartum period

T2 - A qualitative analysis nested in two randomized controlled trials

AU - Teich, Alice S.

AU - Barnett, Josephine

AU - Bonuck, Karen A.

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Objectives: This study examined women's perceptions of early infant feeding experiences and identified early postpartum barriers to successful breastfeeding. Subjects and Methods: We conducted semistructured exit interviews at 6 months postpartum with a subsample of participants (n=67) enrolled in two randomized controlled trials of breastfeeding promotion. Study arms included (1) routine pre- and postnatal visits with an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) (LC group), (2) electronically prompted guidance from prenatal care providers (EP group), (3) EP+LC combined, and (4) standard of care (control group). Interview transcripts were coded using grounded theory and analyzed in MAXqda. Code matrices were used to identify early postpartum breastfeeding barriers and were further examined in relation to treatment group using a mixed methods analysis. Results: The majority of the participants reported experiencing at least one barrier to breastfeeding. Barriers to breastfeeding were more commonly reported in the early postpartum than late postpartum period. The most common barrier during the early postpartum period was the perception of inadequate milk supply ("lactational") (n=18), followed by problems with latch, medical problems that were perceived as precluding breastfeeding, and medical staff and hospital practices. Participants frequently reported that the IBCLCs assisted them in anticipating, managing, and overcoming these barriers. Conclusions: Our findings underscore the importance of integrating IBCLCs into routine pre- and postpartum care because they provide critical support that effectively addresses early postpartum barriers to breastfeeding.

AB - Objectives: This study examined women's perceptions of early infant feeding experiences and identified early postpartum barriers to successful breastfeeding. Subjects and Methods: We conducted semistructured exit interviews at 6 months postpartum with a subsample of participants (n=67) enrolled in two randomized controlled trials of breastfeeding promotion. Study arms included (1) routine pre- and postnatal visits with an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) (LC group), (2) electronically prompted guidance from prenatal care providers (EP group), (3) EP+LC combined, and (4) standard of care (control group). Interview transcripts were coded using grounded theory and analyzed in MAXqda. Code matrices were used to identify early postpartum breastfeeding barriers and were further examined in relation to treatment group using a mixed methods analysis. Results: The majority of the participants reported experiencing at least one barrier to breastfeeding. Barriers to breastfeeding were more commonly reported in the early postpartum than late postpartum period. The most common barrier during the early postpartum period was the perception of inadequate milk supply ("lactational") (n=18), followed by problems with latch, medical problems that were perceived as precluding breastfeeding, and medical staff and hospital practices. Participants frequently reported that the IBCLCs assisted them in anticipating, managing, and overcoming these barriers. Conclusions: Our findings underscore the importance of integrating IBCLCs into routine pre- and postpartum care because they provide critical support that effectively addresses early postpartum barriers to breastfeeding.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84893085385&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84893085385&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/bfm.2013.0063

DO - 10.1089/bfm.2013.0063

M3 - Article

C2 - 24304033

AN - SCOPUS:84893085385

VL - 9

SP - 9

EP - 15

JO - Breastfeeding Medicine

JF - Breastfeeding Medicine

SN - 1556-8253

IS - 1

ER -