When lysosomes get old

Ana Maria Cuervo, J. Fred Dice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

170 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Changes in the lysosomes of senescent tissues and organisms are common and have been used as biomarkers of aging. Lysosomes are responsible for the degradation of many macromolecules, including proteins. At least five different pathways for the delivery of substrate proteins to lysosomes are known. Three of these pathways decline with age, and the molecular explanations for these deficiencies are currently being studied. Other aspects of lysosomal proteolysis increase or do not change with age in spite of marked changes in lysosomal morphology and biochemistry. Age-related changes in certain lysosomal pathways of proteolysis remain to be studied. This area of research is important because abnormalities in lysosomal protein degradation pathways may contribute to several characteristics and pathologies associated with aging. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-131
Number of pages13
JournalExperimental Gerontology
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Proteolysis
Lysosomes
Aging of materials
Degradation
Biochemistry
Biomarkers
Pathology
Macromolecules
Proteins
Tissue
Substrates
Research
lysosomal proteins

Keywords

  • β-amyloid deposits
  • Aging
  • Endosomal system
  • Lipofuscin deposits
  • Lysosomal
  • Protein degradation
  • Senescence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

When lysosomes get old. / Cuervo, Ana Maria; Dice, J. Fred.

In: Experimental Gerontology, Vol. 35, No. 2, 03.2000, p. 119-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cuervo, Ana Maria ; Dice, J. Fred. / When lysosomes get old. In: Experimental Gerontology. 2000 ; Vol. 35, No. 2. pp. 119-131.
@article{481feb868f534158873e5a85d001b248,
title = "When lysosomes get old",
abstract = "Changes in the lysosomes of senescent tissues and organisms are common and have been used as biomarkers of aging. Lysosomes are responsible for the degradation of many macromolecules, including proteins. At least five different pathways for the delivery of substrate proteins to lysosomes are known. Three of these pathways decline with age, and the molecular explanations for these deficiencies are currently being studied. Other aspects of lysosomal proteolysis increase or do not change with age in spite of marked changes in lysosomal morphology and biochemistry. Age-related changes in certain lysosomal pathways of proteolysis remain to be studied. This area of research is important because abnormalities in lysosomal protein degradation pathways may contribute to several characteristics and pathologies associated with aging. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Inc.",
keywords = "β-amyloid deposits, Aging, Endosomal system, Lipofuscin deposits, Lysosomal, Protein degradation, Senescence",
author = "Cuervo, {Ana Maria} and Dice, {J. Fred}",
year = "2000",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1016/S0531-5565(00)00075-9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "35",
pages = "119--131",
journal = "Experimental Gerontology",
issn = "0531-5565",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - When lysosomes get old

AU - Cuervo, Ana Maria

AU - Dice, J. Fred

PY - 2000/3

Y1 - 2000/3

N2 - Changes in the lysosomes of senescent tissues and organisms are common and have been used as biomarkers of aging. Lysosomes are responsible for the degradation of many macromolecules, including proteins. At least five different pathways for the delivery of substrate proteins to lysosomes are known. Three of these pathways decline with age, and the molecular explanations for these deficiencies are currently being studied. Other aspects of lysosomal proteolysis increase or do not change with age in spite of marked changes in lysosomal morphology and biochemistry. Age-related changes in certain lysosomal pathways of proteolysis remain to be studied. This area of research is important because abnormalities in lysosomal protein degradation pathways may contribute to several characteristics and pathologies associated with aging. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Inc.

AB - Changes in the lysosomes of senescent tissues and organisms are common and have been used as biomarkers of aging. Lysosomes are responsible for the degradation of many macromolecules, including proteins. At least five different pathways for the delivery of substrate proteins to lysosomes are known. Three of these pathways decline with age, and the molecular explanations for these deficiencies are currently being studied. Other aspects of lysosomal proteolysis increase or do not change with age in spite of marked changes in lysosomal morphology and biochemistry. Age-related changes in certain lysosomal pathways of proteolysis remain to be studied. This area of research is important because abnormalities in lysosomal protein degradation pathways may contribute to several characteristics and pathologies associated with aging. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Inc.

KW - β-amyloid deposits

KW - Aging

KW - Endosomal system

KW - Lipofuscin deposits

KW - Lysosomal

KW - Protein degradation

KW - Senescence

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034113064&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034113064&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0531-5565(00)00075-9

DO - 10.1016/S0531-5565(00)00075-9

M3 - Article

C2 - 10767573

AN - SCOPUS:0034113064

VL - 35

SP - 119

EP - 131

JO - Experimental Gerontology

JF - Experimental Gerontology

SN - 0531-5565

IS - 2

ER -