When accurate cytomorphology directs clinical decision: Colonic adenocarcinoma presents initially with an isolated vertebral bone metastasis

Saeed Asiry, Ammar Matloob, Shweta Gera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Liver is the most common site for metastasis of colonic adenocarcinoma. Other relatively common metastatic locations include: peritoneum, lungs and ovaries. Rare metastatic sites include: central nervous system, testis, uterus, oral cavity and bones. Though it is rare to have an isolated bone metastasis without liver or visceral involvement in colonic adenocarcinoma, it can occur. Our case illustrates the vital role of an accurate cytopathologic diagnosis in directing the proper clinical decision and management in our young patient. Our patient's first presentation was acute on chronic back pain radiating to his lower extremities with clinical suspicion of tuberculosis spondylitis. The correct cytopathologic diagnosis of the fine needle aspiration from the destructive vertebral lesion led to the establishment of an isolated metastatic colonic adenocarcinoma diagnosis initially and directed the clinical management of our patient.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1325-1327
Number of pages3
JournalDiagnostic Cytopathology
Volume48
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Keywords

  • adenocarcinoma
  • colon
  • cytomorphology
  • metastasis
  • vertebral

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Histology

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