Vitamin A deficiency and maternal-infant transmission of HIV in two metropolitan areas in the United States

Barbara L. Greenberg, Richard D. Semba, Peter E. Vink, John J. Farley, Malathy Sivapalasingam, Richard W. Steketee, Donald M. Thea, Ellie Schoenbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether vitamin A deficiency is associated with maternal-infant HIV transmission among HIV-infected pregnant women in two United States cities. Methods: Third trimester serum vitamin A levels were evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography in 133 HIV-infected women who delivered livebirths during May 1986 to May 1994 and whose infants had known HIV infection status. Results: Sixteen per cent (seven out of 44) of the transmitting mothers and 6% (five out of 89) of the non-transmitting mothers had severe vitamin A deficiency (< 0.70 μmol/l; P = 0.05). Maternal-infant transmission was also associated with prematurity < 37 weeks gestation (P = 0.02), and Cesarean section delivery (P = 0.04), CD4 percentage (P = 0.03) and marginally associated with duration of membrane rupture of ≤ 4 h (P = 0.06) by univariate analysis. In a multivariate logistic regression model, severe vitamin A deficiency [adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 5.05; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.20-21.24], Cesarean section delivery (AOR 3.75; 95% CI, 1.10-12.87), and prematurity (AOR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.22-4.13) were associated with transmission after adjusting for CD4+ percentage, and duration of membrane rupture. Conclusion: Increased risk of maternal-infant transmission was associated with severe vitamin A deficiency among non-breastfeeding women in these cohorts from the United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)325-332
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

Fingerprint

Vitamin A Deficiency
Mothers
HIV
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Cesarean Section
Rupture
Logistic Models
Membranes
Third Pregnancy Trimester
Vitamin A
HIV Infections
Pregnant Women
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography
Pregnancy
Serum

Keywords

  • HIV
  • Perinatal transmission
  • Retinol
  • Vitamin A

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Greenberg, B. L., Semba, R. D., Vink, P. E., Farley, J. J., Sivapalasingam, M., Steketee, R. W., ... Schoenbaum, E. (1997). Vitamin A deficiency and maternal-infant transmission of HIV in two metropolitan areas in the United States. AIDS, 11(3), 325-332. https://doi.org/10.1097/00002030-199703110-00010

Vitamin A deficiency and maternal-infant transmission of HIV in two metropolitan areas in the United States. / Greenberg, Barbara L.; Semba, Richard D.; Vink, Peter E.; Farley, John J.; Sivapalasingam, Malathy; Steketee, Richard W.; Thea, Donald M.; Schoenbaum, Ellie.

In: AIDS, Vol. 11, No. 3, 1997, p. 325-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Greenberg, BL, Semba, RD, Vink, PE, Farley, JJ, Sivapalasingam, M, Steketee, RW, Thea, DM & Schoenbaum, E 1997, 'Vitamin A deficiency and maternal-infant transmission of HIV in two metropolitan areas in the United States', AIDS, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 325-332. https://doi.org/10.1097/00002030-199703110-00010
Greenberg, Barbara L. ; Semba, Richard D. ; Vink, Peter E. ; Farley, John J. ; Sivapalasingam, Malathy ; Steketee, Richard W. ; Thea, Donald M. ; Schoenbaum, Ellie. / Vitamin A deficiency and maternal-infant transmission of HIV in two metropolitan areas in the United States. In: AIDS. 1997 ; Vol. 11, No. 3. pp. 325-332.
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N2 - Objective: To determine whether vitamin A deficiency is associated with maternal-infant HIV transmission among HIV-infected pregnant women in two United States cities. Methods: Third trimester serum vitamin A levels were evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography in 133 HIV-infected women who delivered livebirths during May 1986 to May 1994 and whose infants had known HIV infection status. Results: Sixteen per cent (seven out of 44) of the transmitting mothers and 6% (five out of 89) of the non-transmitting mothers had severe vitamin A deficiency (< 0.70 μmol/l; P = 0.05). Maternal-infant transmission was also associated with prematurity < 37 weeks gestation (P = 0.02), and Cesarean section delivery (P = 0.04), CD4 percentage (P = 0.03) and marginally associated with duration of membrane rupture of ≤ 4 h (P = 0.06) by univariate analysis. In a multivariate logistic regression model, severe vitamin A deficiency [adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 5.05; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.20-21.24], Cesarean section delivery (AOR 3.75; 95% CI, 1.10-12.87), and prematurity (AOR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.22-4.13) were associated with transmission after adjusting for CD4+ percentage, and duration of membrane rupture. Conclusion: Increased risk of maternal-infant transmission was associated with severe vitamin A deficiency among non-breastfeeding women in these cohorts from the United States.

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