Vesicular transport systems in fungi

Marcio L. Rodrigues, Joshua D. Nosanchuk, Augusto Schrank, Marilene H. Vainstein, Arturo Casadevall, Leonardo Nimrichter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Canonical and unconventional mechanisms of secretion in many eukaryotic cells are relatively well known. In contrast to the situation in animal cells, mechanisms of secretion in fungi must include the capacity for trans-cell wall passage of macromolecules to the extracellular space. Although these mechanisms remain somewhat elusive, several studies in recent years have suggested that vesicular transport is required for trans-cell wall secretion of large molecules. Several fungal molecules, including proteins, lipids, polysaccharides and pigments, are released to the extracellular space in vesicles. In pathogenic fungi, a number of these vesicular components are associated with fungal virulence. Indeed, extracellular vesicles produced by fungi can interfere with the immunomodulatory activity of host cells. Fungal vesicles share many functional aspects with mammalian exosomes and extracellular vesicles produced by bacteria, plants and protozoa, but their cellular origin remains unknown. Here, we discuss the involvement of vesicular transport systems in fungal physiology and pathogenesis, making parallels with the mammalian, bacterial, protozoan and plant cell literature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1371-1381
Number of pages11
JournalFuture Microbiology
Volume6
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011

Fingerprint

Fungi
Extracellular Space
Cell Wall
Exosomes
Plant Cells
Eukaryotic Cells
Polysaccharides
Virulence
Bacteria
Lipids
Proteins
Extracellular Vesicles

Keywords

  • Cryptococcus neoformans
  • Extracellular vesicles
  • Fungal pathogens
  • Secretion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Rodrigues, M. L., Nosanchuk, J. D., Schrank, A., Vainstein, M. H., Casadevall, A., & Nimrichter, L. (2011). Vesicular transport systems in fungi. Future Microbiology, 6(11), 1371-1381. https://doi.org/10.2217/fmb.11.112

Vesicular transport systems in fungi. / Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Schrank, Augusto; Vainstein, Marilene H.; Casadevall, Arturo; Nimrichter, Leonardo.

In: Future Microbiology, Vol. 6, No. 11, 11.2011, p. 1371-1381.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rodrigues, ML, Nosanchuk, JD, Schrank, A, Vainstein, MH, Casadevall, A & Nimrichter, L 2011, 'Vesicular transport systems in fungi', Future Microbiology, vol. 6, no. 11, pp. 1371-1381. https://doi.org/10.2217/fmb.11.112
Rodrigues ML, Nosanchuk JD, Schrank A, Vainstein MH, Casadevall A, Nimrichter L. Vesicular transport systems in fungi. Future Microbiology. 2011 Nov;6(11):1371-1381. https://doi.org/10.2217/fmb.11.112
Rodrigues, Marcio L. ; Nosanchuk, Joshua D. ; Schrank, Augusto ; Vainstein, Marilene H. ; Casadevall, Arturo ; Nimrichter, Leonardo. / Vesicular transport systems in fungi. In: Future Microbiology. 2011 ; Vol. 6, No. 11. pp. 1371-1381.
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