Vasoprotective effects of resveratrol and SIRT1: Attenuation of cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress and proinflammatory phenotypic alterations

Anna Csiszar, Nazar Labinskyy, Andrej Podlutsky, Pawel M. Kaminski, Michael S. Wolin, Cuihua Zhang, Partha Mukhopadhyay, Pal Pacher, Furong Hu, Rafael De Cabo, Praveen Ballabh, Zoltan Ungvari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

215 Scopus citations

Abstract

The dietary polyphenolic compound resveratrol, by activating the protein deacetylase enzyme silent information regulator 2/sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), prolongs life span in evolutionarily distant organisms and may mimic the cytoprotective effects of dietary restriction. The present study was designed to elucidate the effects of resveratrol on cigarette smoke-induced vascular oxidative stress and inflammation, which is a clinically highly relevant model of accelerated vascular aging. Cigarette smoke exposure of rats impaired the acetylcholine-induced relaxation of carotid arteries, which could be prevented by resveratrol treatment. Smoking and in vitro treatment with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) increased reactive oxygen species production in rat arteries and cultured coronary arterial endothelial cells (CAECs), respectively, which was attenuated by resveratrol treatment. The smoking-induced upregulation of inflammatory markers (ICAM-1, inducible nitric oxide synthase, IL-6, and TNF-α) in rat arteries was also abrogated by resveratrol treatment. Resveratrol also inhibited CSE-induced NF-κB activation and inflammatory gene expression in CAECs. In CAECs, the aforementioned protective effects of resveratrol were abolished by knockdown of SIRT1, whereas the overexpression of SIRT1 mimicked the effects of resveratrol. Resveratrol treatment of rats protected aortic endothelial cells against cigarette smoking-induced apoptotic cell death. Resveratrol also exerted antiapoptotic effects in CSE-treated CAECs, which could be abrogated by knockdown of SIRT1. Resveratrol treatment also attenuated CSE-induced DNA damage in CAECs (comet assay). Thus resveratrol and SIRT1 exert antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic effects, which protect the endothelial cells against the adverse effects of cigarette smoking-induced oxidative stress. The vasoprotective effects of resveratrol will likely contribute to its anti-aging action in mammals and may be especially beneficial in pathophysiological conditions associated with accelerated vascular aging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)H2721-H2735
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume294
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Apoptosis
  • Inflammation
  • Polyphenol
  • Sirtuin 1
  • Stroke
  • Tobacco
  • Vascular aging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Vasoprotective effects of resveratrol and SIRT1: Attenuation of cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress and proinflammatory phenotypic alterations'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Csiszar, A., Labinskyy, N., Podlutsky, A., Kaminski, P. M., Wolin, M. S., Zhang, C., Mukhopadhyay, P., Pacher, P., Hu, F., De Cabo, R., Ballabh, P., & Ungvari, Z. (2008). Vasoprotective effects of resveratrol and SIRT1: Attenuation of cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress and proinflammatory phenotypic alterations. American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, 294(6), H2721-H2735. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpheart.00235.2008