Variations in Perioperative Antibiotic Prescriptions Among Academic Urologists After Ambulatory Endoscopic Urologic Surgery: Impact on Infection Rates and Validation of 2019 Best Practice Statement

Meenakshi Davuluri, Ari P. Bernstein, Ethan Fram, Kara L. Watts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate adherence to the American Urologic Association (AUA) best practice statement guidelines regarding antibiotic duration in the perioperative setting for endoscopic urologic surgery. We assessed concordance to these guidelines among adult urologists at a single academic institution and its correlation with postoperative positive urine cultures as it relates to the revised 2019 best practice statement. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of all adult endoscopic ambulatory urologic surgeries performed over an 18-month period by urologists at our institution. Patient demographics, pre- and postoperative urine cultures, operative details, stent or foley use, and antibiotic prescriptions were reviewed. Chi-squared and linear regression analyses were done. Results: Three hundred thirty patients were included for analysis. Sixty-two percent of patients were prescribed postoperative antibiotics, for an average of 4 days. Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole and fluroquinolones were most often prescribed (43% and 38%, respectively). Intraoperative stent placement, positive urine culture within 30 days prior to surgery, and a positive urine culture within 1 year prior to surgery predicted antibiotic prescription. No significant differences were seen in rates of positive postoperative urine culture rates between cohorts that received antibiotics postoperatively vs those who did not. Conclusions: At our academic institution, we observed poor concordance with the AUA best practice statement for perioperative antibiotic prescription after ambulatory endoscopic urologic surgery. Rates of positive postoperative cultures were low and not associated with receipt or duration of antibiotic prescription at the time of surgery, supporting minimal use of antibiotics for most endoscopic cases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalUrology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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